Fordism


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Fordism

the theory of Henry Ford stating that production efficiency is dependent on successful assembly-line methods.
See also: Economics
Translations
fordisme
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References in periodicals archive ?
This book covers not only the technical aspects (mechanization, power sources, new materials, interchangeable parts, electricity, automation), but organizational innovations (division of labor, Fordism, Talyorism, Lean).
The Henry Fordism of cheddar production in many ways anticipated the advent of industrial agriculture.
In the The Modern Prince and Americanism and Fordism (as edited by Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell Smith) Gramsci discusses how institutions inherited from previous epochs always play an integral part in forming the terrain of any political struggle.
This revelation resonates diachronically as well, as Breu suggests that the base-superstructure dynamic also organizes the relationship between early twentieth-century Fordism and late twentieth-century post-Fordism.
To explain the posited relationship simply: the classic techniques of disciplinary power identified by Foucault in studies such as Discipline and Pun ish can clearly be identified with some of the key organisational techniques which defined Fordism as a novel form of capitalism, at the level both of the factory and of the general social formation.
India innovated by applying Fordism to their health care system.
We thus discuss the novella as an esoteric allegory for the decline of the unique configuration of post-war Australian capitalism which, using the concepts and methodology of the PRA, we dub antipodean Fordism (Heino, 2014).
manufacturing industries, Fordism and deindustrialisation, degraded work vs.
They offer historical examinations of business philanthropy in 19th-century Europe, reflections on fascist welfare in Fordism and Taylorism, and speculations on the future of paternalistic policies under global capitalism.
The characteristics of Fordism have to be first examined before analyzing their difference with post-Fordism.
To achieve this end, Mah draws on methodologies and previous research by others in the fields of community studies (especially research in 'rust belt' cities), a variety of literature dealing with transitions from industrial to post-industrial, Fordism to post-Fordism, uneven geographical development (particularly capitalist growth and destruction in urban areas) and sociology of landscapes and legacies of the past.
The underlying explanation for the transformation of the post-war hegemonic world order is related to the structural crisis of Fordism, which resulted in stagnation within the productive sectors of the most industrialized capitalist countries and to the process of financialization, i.