entomology

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Related to Forensic entomology: forensic pathology

en·to·mol·o·gy

 (ĕn′tə-mŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of insects.

en′to·mo·log′ic (-mə-lŏj′ĭk), en′to·mo·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
en′to·mo·log′i·cal·ly adv.
en′to·mol′o·gist n.

entomology

(ˌɛntəˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Zoology) the branch of science concerned with the study of insects
entomological, ˌentomoˈlogic adj
ˌentomoˈlogically adv
ˌentoˈmologist n

en•to•mol•o•gy

(ˌɛn təˈmɒl ə dʒi)

n.
the branch of zoology dealing with insects.
[1760–70]
en`to•mo•log′i•cal (-məˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) en`to•mo•log′ic, adj.
en`to•mo•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
en`to•mol′o•gist, n.

en·to·mol·o·gy

(ĕn′tə-mŏl′ə-jē)
The scientific study of insects.
Word History Scientists who study insects (there are close to a million that can be studied!) are called entomologists. Why are they not called "insectologists"? Well, in a way they are. The word insect comes from the Latin word insectum, meaning "cut up or divided into segments." (The plural of insectum, namely insecta, is used by scientists as the name of the taxonomic class that insects belong to.) This Latin word was created in order to translate the Greek word for "insect," which is entomon. This Greek word also literally means "cut up or divided into segments," and it is the source of the word entomology. The Greeks had coined this term for insects because of the clear division of insect bodies into three segments, now called the head, thorax, and abdomen.

entomology

the branch of zoology that studies insects. Also called insectology. — entomologist, n. — entomologie, entomological, adj.
See also: Insects
the study of insects. — entomologist, n.entomologie, entomological, adj.
See also: Zoology

entomology

1. The study of insects.
2. Study of insects.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.entomology - the branch of zoology that studies insectsentomology - the branch of zoology that studies insects
lepidopterology, lepidoptery - the branch of entomology dealing with Lepidoptera
zoological science, zoology - the branch of biology that studies animals
caste - in some social insects (such as ants) a physically distinct individual or group of individuals specialized to perform certain functions in the colony
Translations
entomologie
entomologi
hyönteistiede
कीटविज्ञान
entomologija
entomologie
entomologija
entomologi

entomology

[ˌentəˈmɒlədʒɪ] Nentomología f

entomology

[ˌɛntəˈmɒlədʒi] n (= science) → entomologie f

entomology

nEntomologie f, → Insektenkunde f

entomology

[ˌɛntəˈmɒlədʒɪ] nentomologia
References in periodicals archive ?
Lieutenant Colonel Ahmad Mattar Al Muhairi, Acting Director of Forensic Sciences and Criminology Department at Dubai Police, said the Forensic Entomology Department would help investigations by studying the bugs' life cycle inside and outside dead bodies.
Forensic entomology - the study of insects for medico-legal purposes - helps in discovering the estimated time of death, which is the most common need for police.
The use of carrion insects for postmortem interval (PMI) estimation is a common application of forensic entomology (Wells & LaMotte 2010).
In clear language, McAlister explains Diptera taxonomy and forensic entomology, and describes the potential of flies to transform their relationship with humans from one of disease vector to partner in environmental preservation.
In addition, a one-day, hands-on workshop was given entitled "Death Scene Investigation--A Forensic Entomology Field Training".
Objective: Specifically, we aimed to perform a listing the most frequent species in which they occur, identify species that have been previously associated with medico-legal practices and draw perspectives on the status of the scientific research and on the potential of forensic entomology as a routine procedure in the region.
Biodiversity, Calliphoridae, Diptera, Forensic entomology, Small bait trap.
Mammalian carcasses are the most well recorded regarding ant foraging, mainly due to the frequent use of pig carcasses in forensic entomology experiments in Brazil, in which the most common genera are Camponotus, Cyphomyrmex, Atta, Strumigeny, Pheidole, Odontomachus (Cruz & Vasconcelos, 2006), Ectatomma (Cruz & Vasconcelos, 2006; Gomes, Gomes, & Desuo, 2009), Pachycondyla (Cruz & Vasconcelos, 2006; Gomes et al.
Keywords: Silphidae, carrion, forensic entomology, Nicrophorus tomentosus
After introducing the field, crime scene investigation, and the nature of evidence, chapters cover tools like separation sciences, spectroscopy, and microscopy; fingerprints and other impressions, questioned documents, and firearms and toolmarks; forensic pathology, anthropology and odontology, forensic entomology, serology, DNA typing, and hair; forensic chemistry for various substances; and presenting evidence in court.
Insects also involved in our society welfare, their role in the field of criminology: Forensic entomology deals with the knowledge of 'time of death' by using behavior and development of carrion fly maggots, which are considered as the first witness to murder.

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