genetic fingerprinting

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Related to Forensic genetics: genetic profiling, DNA profiling, DNA evidence, Dna matching

DNA fingerprinting


n.
the use of a DNA probe for the identification of an individual, as for the matching of genes from a forensic sample with those of a criminal suspect.
Also called genetic fingerprinting.
[1985–90]
DNA fingerprint,

n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.genetic fingerprinting - the procedure of analyzing the DNA in samples of a person's body tissue or body fluid for the purpose of identification
procedure, process - a particular course of action intended to achieve a result; "the procedure of obtaining a driver's license"; "it was a process of trial and error"
Translations
genetikai ujjlenyomat

genetic fingerprinting

[dʒɪˈnɛtɪkˈfɪŋgəˌprɪntɪŋ] nrilevamento delle impronte genetiche
References in periodicals archive ?
Harris County is seeking proposals from qualified vendors to provide forensic services to include serology (body fluid identification) and nuclear DNA testing for the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences Forensic Genetics Laboratory (HCFGL) for a period of one year beginning on or about November 1, 2015 and ending twelve months thereafter.
During the past 23 years, FAFG has earned the respect, trust, and support of victims' families and international recognition having conducted 1,700 investigations, recovered more than 7,400 victims' remains, and established the ISO 17025:2005 accreditation of FAFG's Forensic Genetics Laboratory.
Dr Dagmar Heinrich, a research fellow at Huddersfield University, will speak on the utility of forensic evidence, while Dr Graham Williams, who heads the Huddersfield's Forensic Genetics Research Group, describes key features of his DNA research.
Dr Denise Syndercombe-Court, forensic genetics expert at King's College London, said: "We won't need an actual eyewitness to produce a picture of how the suspect looks.
He is a member of the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM), International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) and the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS).
As the title of the book makes clear, it is almost impossible to discuss non-technical understandings of forensic genetics without engaging with the "CSI Effect", i.
For further details see William Goodwin, Adrian Linacre and Sibte Hadi, An Introduction to Forensic Genetics (John Wiley and Sons, 2007) 13-14.
There are new chapters on emerging technologies for tagging elasmobranches and recent advances in elasmobranch immunology, plus updated material on reproduction and applications of forensic genetics.
A British consultant in forensic genetics, Wall offers scientists a guide for providing expert testimony in court cases.
Shriver, Frudakis and Budowle, in their response, published under the heading "Getting the Science and the Ethics Right in Forensic Genetics," pointed out that population is and has always been a central concept in biology, that advanced statistical methods enable the characteristics of populations to be clearly defined, that the current state-of-the-art method in measuring ancestry is admixture estimation, not binning or categorization, and that the inference of phenotype indirectly from a knowledge of ancestry admixture can be made through the use of systematic and rational approaches, such as DNAPrint's objective and empirical database-driven processes.
com/reports/c70364) has announced the addition of An Introduction to Forensic Genetics to their offering.

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