eschatology

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es·cha·tol·o·gy

 (ĕs′kə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of theology that is concerned with the end of the world or of humankind.
2. A belief or a doctrine concerning the ultimate or final things, such as death, the destiny of humanity, the Second Coming, or the Last Judgment.

[Greek eskhatos, last; see eghs in Indo-European roots + -logy.]

es·chat′o·log′i·cal (ĭ-skăt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl, ĕs′kə-tə-lŏj′-) adj.
es·chat′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
es′cha·tol′o·gist n.

eschatology

(ˌɛskəˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Theology) the branch of theology or biblical exegesis concerned with the end of the world
[C19: from Greek eskhatos last]
eschatological, ˌeschatoˈlogic adj
ˌeschatoˈlogically adv
ˌeschaˈtologist n

es•cha•tol•o•gy

(ˌɛs kəˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. any system of religious doctrines concerning last or final matters, as death, judgment, or an afterlife.
2. the branch of theology dealing with such matters.
[1835–45; < Greek éschato(s) last + -logy]
es•cha•to•log•i•cal (ˌɛs kə tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl, ɛˌskæt l-) adj.
es`cha•to•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
es`cha•tol′o•gist, n.

eschatology

Theology. any set of doctrines concerning flnal matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj. — eschatologist, n.
See also: End of the World
any set of doctrines concerning final matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj.eschatologist, n.
See also: Theology

eschatology

The branch of theology that deals with the end of the world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eschatology - the branch of theology that is concerned with such final things as death and Last Judgment; Heaven and Hell; the ultimate destiny of humankind
theology, divinity - the rational and systematic study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truth
Translations
eschatologie
eskatologia
eschatologie

eschatology

[ˌeskəˈtɒlədʒɪ] N (Rel) → escatología f

eschatology

nEschatologie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Both Marten van Heemskerck's Jonah under his Gourd (1561) and his Four Last Things (1565)--which, with its mass of resurrected nudes and acidic colour, heralds the advent of Dutch Mannerism--were bought by Charles II in 1662, marking an enthusiasm presumably developed during his exile in the Netherlands.
The evidence indeed suggests that during the last years of his life, Cervantes's thoughts bore principally upon "the Four last things of Christian eschatology: Heaven, Hell, death and the Final Judgment" (12).