France


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France

France

 (frăns)
A country of western Europe. It was settled by the Franks after the retreat of the Romans, who had conquered Celtic Gaul in 58-51 bc. Though Charlemagne incorporated it into his Empire of the West after ad 800, France was eventually split into numerous fiefdoms and principalities, many of which were not incorporated into the royal domain until the time of Louis XI (reigned 1461-1483). Widespread poverty and discontent led to the French Revolution (1789) and the end of the monarchy. The First Republic (1792-1804) was followed by the First Empire (1804-1815) under Napoleon I, a period of constitutional monarchy (1814-1848), and a succession of republics broken by the Second Empire (1852-1870) under Napoleon III. Much of France was occupied by Germany in World War II. Paris is the capital and the largest city.

France

(frɑːns)
n
(Placename) a republic in W Europe, between the English Channel, the Mediterranean, and the Atlantic: the largest country wholly in Europe; became a republic in 1793 after the French Revolution and an empire in 1804 under Napoleon; reverted to a monarchy (1815–48), followed by the Second Republic (1848–52), the Second Empire (1852–70), the Third Republic (1870–1940), and the Fourth and Fifth Republics (1946 and 1958); a member of the European Union. It is generally flat or undulating in the north and west and mountainous in the south and east. Official language: French. Religion: Roman Catholic majority. Currency: euro. Capital: Paris. Pop: 62 814 233 (2013 est). Area: (including Corsica) 551 600 sq km (212 973 sq miles).

France

(French frɑ̃s)
n
(Biography) Anatole (anatɔl), real name Anatole François Thibault. 1844–1924, French novelist, short-story writer, and critic. His works include Le Crime de Sylvestre Bonnard (1881), L'Île des Pingouins (1908), and La Révolte des anges (1914): Nobel prize for literature 1921

France

(fræns, frɑns)

n.
1. Anatole (Jacques Anatole Thibault), 1844–1924, French author: Nobel prize 1921.
2. a republic in W Europe. 58,978,172; 212,736 sq. mi. (550,985 sq. km). Cap.: Paris.

France


a fondness or prejudice for French life, manners, etc.
an obsession with France and things French.
Gallophil.
a hatred of France or things French. Also called Gallophobia.
a French expression used in English, as outré.
a person, not French, who loves France. Also called Francophile.
Francophobia.
a form of mild republicanism in France, 1791-1793, led by natives of the Gironde. — Girondist, n., adj.
the traits, customs, and culture of the Normans. — Normanist, n.Normanic, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.France - a republic in western EuropeFrance - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
apache dance - a violent fast dance in French vaudeville (an apache is a member of the French underworld)
Agincourt - a battle in northern France in which English longbowmen under Henry V decisively defeated a much larger French army in 1415
Battle of the Marne, Belleau Wood, Chateau-Thierry, Marne River - a World War I battle in northwestern France where the Allies defeated the Germans in 1918
Chalons, Chalons-sur-Marne - the battle in which Attila the Hun was defeated by the Romans and Visigoths in 451
battle of Crecy, Crecy - the first decisive battle of the Hundred Years' War; in 1346 the English under Edward III defeated the French under Philip of Valois
Dunkerque, Dunkirk - an amphibious evacuation in World War II (1940) when 330,000 Allied troops had to be evacuated from the beaches in northern France in a desperate retreat under enemy fire
battle of Ivry, Ivry, Ivry la Bataille - a battle (1590) in which the Huguenots under Henry IV defeated the Catholics under the duke of Mayenne
Argonne, Argonne Forest, Meuse-Argonne, Meuse-Argonne operation, Meuse, Meuse River - an American operation in World War I (1918); American troops under Pershing drove back the German armies which were saved only by the armistice on November 11
siege of Orleans, Orleans - a long siege of Orleans by the English was relieved by Joan of Arc in 1429
battle of Poitiers, Poitiers - the battle in 1356 in which the English under the Black Prince defeated the French
Battle of Rocroi, Rocroi - a battle in the Thirty Years' War (1643); the French defeated the Spanish invaders
battle of St Mihiel, Saint-Mihiel, St Mihiel - a battle in the Meuse-Argonne operation in World War I (1918); the battle in which American troops launched their first offensive in France
battle of Soissons-Reims, battle of the Aisne, battle of the Chemin-des-Dames, Soissons - a battle in World War I (May 1918); the Germans tried to attack before the American numbers were too great to defeat; the tactical success of the Germans proved to be a strategic failure
Battle of the Somme, Somme, Somme River - battle in World War I (1916)
Battle of the Somme, Somme, Somme River - battle of World War II (1944)
battle of Tertry, Tertry - a battle in France in 687 among the descendants of Clovis
battle of Valmy, Valmy - the French defeated the Austrian and Prussian troops in 1792 (with a famous cannonade from the French artillery)
battle of Verdun, Verdun - a battle in World War I (1916); in some of the bloodiest fighting in World War I the German offensive was stopped
French Revolution - the revolution in France against the Bourbons; 1789-1799
Bastille - a fortress built in Paris in the 14th century and used as a prison in the 17th and 18th centuries; it was destroyed July 14, 1789 at the start of the French Revolution
Maginot Line - a fortification built before World War II to protect France's eastern border; initially considered to be impregnable, it was easily overrun by the German army in 1940
maisonette, maisonnette - a small house
oriflamme - a red or orange-red flag used as a standard by early French kings
rue - (French) a street or road in France
tricolor, tricolour - a flag having three colored stripes (especially the French flag)
Palace of Versailles, Versailles - a palace built in the 17th century for Louis XIV southwest of Paris near the city of Versailles
jeu d'esprit - a witty comment or writing
bon mot, mot - a clever remark
French - the Romance language spoken in France and in countries colonized by France
bonheur - (French) happiness and good humor
haute cuisine - (French) an elaborate and skillful manner of preparing food
nouvelle cuisine - a school of French cooking that uses light sauces and tries to bring out the natural flavors of foods instead of making heavy use of butter and cream
bureau de change - (French) an establishment where you can exchange foreign money
FLNC, National Liberation Front of Corsica - a terrorist group formed in 1976 to work for Corsican independence; attacks on Corsica are aimed at sabotaging public infrastructure and symbols of colonialism
ancien regime - a political and social system that no longer governs (especially the system that existed in France before the French Revolution)
estate of the realm, the three estates, estate - a major social class or order of persons regarded collectively as part of the body politic of the country (especially in the United Kingdom) and formerly possessing distinct political rights
2.France - French writer of sophisticated novels and short stories (1844-1924)France - French writer of sophisticated novels and short stories (1844-1924)

France

noun
Related words
adjective French, Gallic
see administrative regions
Translations
فرنسافَرَنسا
Francie
Frankrig
FrancioFrancujo
Prantsusmaa
فرانسه
Ranska
Francuska
Franciaország
PerancisPrancis
Frakkland
フランス
프랑스
Gallia
Prancūzija
Francija
Franţa
Francija
Frankrike
ประเทศฝรั่งเศส
nước PhápPháp

France

[frɑːns] NFrancia f

France

[ˈfrɑːns] nla France
in France → en France
to France → en France
He's from France → Il est français.

France

nFrankreich nt

France

[frɑːns] nla Francia

France

فَرَنسا Francie Frankrig Frankreich Γαλλία Francia Ranska France Francuska Francia フランス 프랑스 Frankrijk Frankrike Francja França Франция Frankrike ประเทศฝรั่งเศส Fransa nước Pháp 法国
References in classic literature ?
She took a fancy to Mademoiselle, and amused her very much with odd stories of her life in France, when Amy sat with her while she got up Madam's laces.
It was a sad looking place, which for many years had not known the gentle presence of a mistress, old Monsieur Aubigny having married and buried his wife in France, and she having loved her own land too well ever to leave it.
A wide and apparently an impervious boundary of forests severed the possessions of the hostile provinces of France and England.
In fact, this scaffold constituted a portion of a penal machine, which now, for two or three generations past, has been merely historical and traditionary among us, but was held, in the old time, to be as effectual an agent, in the promotion of good citizenship, as ever was the guillotine among the terrorists of France.
of France, at his own personal expense, fit out whaling ships from Dunkirk, and politely invite to that town some score or two of families from our own island of Nantucket?
Detached broken fossils of pre-adamite whales, fragments of their bones and skeletons, have within thirty years past, at various intervals, been found at the base of the Alps, in Lombardy, in France, in England, in Scotland, and in the States of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.
He had lived in Silesia, a member of a despised and persecuted race, and had taken part in the proletarian movement in the early seventies, when Bismarck, having conquered France, had turned his policy of blood and iron upon the "International.
Michaux, who knew but part of them, says that "the species of large trees are much more numerous in North America than in Europe; in the United States there are more than one hundred and forty species that exceed thirty feet in height; in France there are but thirty that attain this size.
I stood here, at the very spring and source of the second great period of the world's history; and could see the trickling stream of that history gather and deepen and broaden, and roll its mighty tides down the far centuries; and I could note the upspringing of adven- turers like myself in the shelter of its long array of thrones: De Montforts, Gavestons, Mortimers, Villier- ses; the war-making, campaign-directing wantons of France, and Charles the Second's scepter-wielding drabs; but nowhere in the procession was my full- sized fellow visible.
That poor orphan child is on her way from France - everybody is full of the subject.
But mark you one thing: in my fall the world shall see how the chivalry of France meets death.
I told about Louis Sixteenth that got his head cut off in France long time ago; and about his little boy the dolphin, that would a been a king, but they took and shut him up in jail, and some say he died there.