Franciscan


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Fran·cis·can

 (frăn-sĭs′kən)
n.
A member of an originally mendicant Roman Catholic religious order founded by St. Francis of Assisi in 1209 and dedicated to the virtues of humility and poverty. It is now divided into three independent branches.
adj.
Of or relating to Saint Francis of Assisi or to the order founded by him.

[New Latin Franciscānus, from Medieval Latin Franciscus, from Saint Francis of Assisi.]

Franciscan

(frænˈsɪskən)
n
(Christian Churches, other)
a. a member of any of several Christian religious orders of mendicant friars or nuns tracing their origins back to Saint Francis of Assisi; a Grey Friar
b. (as modifier): a Franciscan friar.

Fran•cis•can

(frænˈsɪs kən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to St. Francis or the Franciscans.
n.
2. a member of the mendicant order founded by St. Francis in the 13th century.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin Francisc(us) + -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Franciscan - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the grey habit of the Franciscan orderFranciscan - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the grey habit of the Franciscan order
Franciscan order - a Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Francis of Assisi in the 13th century
friar, mendicant - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on alms
Adj.1.Franciscan - of or relating to Saint Francis of Assisi or to the order founded by him; "Franciscan monks"
Translations

Franciscan

[frænˈsɪskən]
A. ADJfranciscano
B. Nfranciscano/a m/f

Franciscan

nFranziskaner(in) m(f)
adjFranziskaner-; Franciscan monk/monasteryFranziskanermönch m/-kloster nt
References in classic literature ?
As he passed the Rue de la Huchette, the odor of those admirable spits, which were incessantly turning, tickled his olfactory apparatus, and he bestowed a loving glance toward the Cyclopean roast, which one day drew from the Franciscan friar, Calatagirone, this pathetic exclamation:
There were portraits of men with large, melancholy eyes which seemed to say you knew not what; there were long monks in the Franciscan habit or in the Dominican, with distraught faces, making gestures whose sense escaped you; there was an Assumption of the Virgin; there was a Crucifixion in which the painter by some magic of feeling had been able to suggest that the flesh of Christ's dead body was not human flesh only but divine; and there was an Ascension in which the Saviour seemed to surge up towards the empyrean and yet to stand upon the air as steadily as though it were solid ground: the uplifted arms of the Apostles, the sweep of their draperies, their ecstatic gestures, gave an impression of exultation and of holy joy.
Vincy, the mayor, a florid man, who would have served for a study of flesh in striking contrast with the Franciscan tints of Mr.
The Dominican and Franciscan friars, also, who had come to England in the thirteenth century, soon after the foundation of their orders in Italy, and who had been full at first of passionate zeal for the spiritual and physical welfare of the poor, had now departed widely from their early character and become selfish, luxurious, ignorant, and unprincipled.
The Franciscans immediately succeeded the Jesuits, and subsequently the Dominicans; but the latter managed their affairs ill.
There are about twenty-one missions in this province, most of which were established about fifty years since, and are generally under the care of the Franciscans.
Now she entered the church depressed and humiliated, not even able to remember whether it was built by the Franciscans or the Dominicans.
Among these women an early candidate for sainthood, unquestionably the most famous personality of the Franciscan order's penitential movement in Italy, Margherita the penitent sinner, a "new Magdalen," was also bound by inseverable ties to the small Tuscan town of Cortona, a relationship closely examined in Andre Vauchez' two chapters.
It would have been hard to envision two more different men than the ones who built nearly all California's Franciscan missions.
To improve patient safety and reduce healthcare costs, Franciscan Health System takes major role in first personalized medicine study authorized by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Patel, an accomplished health care executive, has been named Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of CHI Franciscan Health and Senior Vice President of Divisional Operations for the Pacific Northwest Region of Englewood, Colorado-based Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI), CHI Franciscan Health announced today.
In addition, USF's "Solutions" center offers an online Franciscan Studies certificate in four courses that will run from September 2013 through March 2014.

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