Francophile

(redirected from Francophilia)
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Fran·co·phile

 (frăng′kə-fīl′) also Fran·co·phil (-fĭl′)
n.
A person who admires France, its people, or its culture.

Fran′co·phile′ adj.
Fran′co·phil′i·a (-fĭl′ē-ə, -fēl′yə) n.

Francophile

(ˈfræŋkəʊˌfaɪl) or sometimes not capital

Francophil

n
a person who admires France and the French
adj
marked by or possessing admiration of France and the French

Fran•co•phile

(ˈfræŋ kəˌfaɪl)

also Fran•co•phil

(-fɪl)

adj.
1. friendly to or admiring of France or the French.
n.
2. a person who is friendly to or admiring of France or the French.
[1885–90]
Fran•co•phil•i•a (ˌfræŋ kəˈfɪl i ə, -ˈfil yə) n.

Francophile

a person with a fondness for France and things French.
See also: -Phile, -Philia, -Phily
Gallophil.
See also: France

Francophile

Someone who admires France, its culture, or its people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Francophile - an admirer of France and everything French
admirer, booster, protagonist, supporter, champion, friend - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.; "all their supporters came out for the game"; "they are friends of the library"
Translations

francophile

[ˈfræŋkəʊfaɪl] Nfrancófilo/a m/f

Francophile

[ˈfræŋkəʊˌfaɪl] nfrancofilo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
It can mean "friendly feeling toward" such as in francophilia which means admiring of all things French.
Following food writing through trends such as the Southern nostalgia that emerged in the late nineteenth century, the Francophilia of the 1940s, countercultural cooking in the 1970s, and today's cult of locally sourced ingredients, Megan reveals that what we read about food influences us just as much as what we taste.
She belongs to the German group of politicians that tend towards anglophilia, not francophilia.
Though that was the end, from the beginning there was Frenchness, inspired by 'Frank O'Hara's mid-century francophilia, by Jean Cocteau, and by the Nouvelle Vague.
However, Dario's Francophilia is recast as a world desire that needs the French signifier as a historically determined disguise for the universally modern.
French POWs interacted with the civilian population most extensively, and many emphasized that they were well treated at the hands of the Russian nobility on account of its Francophilia, whereas they were often poorly treated by ordinary people, who did not hide their hatred for Napoleons soldiers.
Some foreign accents, for example, a French accent, may be seen as a symbol of cultural sophistication and desirable bilingualism, as a reflection of general Francophilia in many English-speaking countries.
Federalists, for their part, were convinced that the opposition, intoxicated by their Francophilia, would go to any length to advance their revolutionary cause--or their own political aggrandizement.
Along with that of his white gay American counterparts, Strayhorn's Francophilia also functioned as a sign of queer affiliation.
In addition to the Godard retrospective, the NYFF reinforced its reputation for francophilia by selecting no less than seven French features for the Main Slate, among them Abdellatif Kechiche's Blue Is the Warmest Color, which swept away audiences at Cannes, and Claude Lanzmann's The Last of the Unjust, a documentary about Benjamin Murmelstein, the last Jewish elder of Theresienstadt.
The country's social and political elite and those who aspired to join it enthusiastically took up French fashions, manners, and customs, and their ostentatious displays of Francophilia provoked a ferocious response from those lower down the social scale, who felt excluded from centers of political power, and alienated from the foreign cultural forms that members of the elite embraced so passionately.
In many ways, reading Francophilia against Francophobia is a highly colourful means by which to address the representation of national character on the British stage in the aftermath of the French Revolution.