Franklin stove


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Franklin stove
Burning wood above a cold-air duct heats air which then passes through baffles and is released through vents on each side of the stove.

Franklin stove

n.
A cast-iron heating stove shaped like a fireplace but employing metal baffles to increase its heating efficiency.

[After Benjamin Franklin.]

Frank′lin stove′


n.
a cast-iron stove having the general form of a fireplace with the front open and often fitted with doors.
[1780–90, Amer.; after Benjamin Franklin, who designed it]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Franklin stove, invented in 1741 by Benjamin Franklin, is credited as the official precursor to the airtight stove.
There's a bit of a chill in the air, so the kid comes in from gathering firewood, kicks the door open, and drops his load next to the Franklin stove.
The coffee brewed in camp by the 49ers, in the Civil War as Camp Coffee, and later known as Cowboy Coffee is an on-the-road version of the way coffee was prepared in the 19th century home on a Franklin stove in population centers.
In a dusty living room in Petaluma, California, on a sawhorse table next to a Franklin stove, is the aging computer whose dial-up connection serves as William J.
Many of us are familiar with Franklin's "big" inventions: the lightning rod, the Franklin stove and the bifocal glasses.
The Russian Fireplace, the Steinofen and Kachelofen in Europe, and the Tandoor with Tab-khaneh (other spellings include tanur/taba khana) in Afghanistan (6,7) lead up to the development of the 18th century Franklin Stove, which became a preferred heating system in many buildings.
Artifacts related to Franklin's inventions--including bifocals, the Franklin stove, the armonica (glass harmonica), and microscope--and his activities in publishing, firefighting, the postal service, libraries and education, abolishing of slavery, and diplomacy and government.
In this tongue-and-cheek biography of Benjamin Franklin, the inspiration for Ben's inventions and discoveries, including electricity and the Franklin Stove, is no less than Amos, a rather pompous rodent.
I didn't have to throw any sparkly earbobs into the Franklin stove, but the "household goods and personal effects" I'll be allowed to keep are a fraction of the things I've collected over the years.
This all-around eighteenth-century man invented the lightning rod the Franklin stove bifocal lenses and the extendable arm that many stores still use today to reach items on the highest shelves.
Another of Franklin's inventions, the Franklin stove, heated much more --than an open fireplace.
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