Frederick Law Olmsted


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Noun1.Frederick Law Olmsted - United States landscape architect primarily responsible for the design of Central Park in New York City (1822-1903)Frederick Law Olmsted - United States landscape architect primarily responsible for the design of Central Park in New York City (1822-1903)
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The Bonnycastle Hill area was included in the original plan for Cherokee Park by Frederick Law Olmsted.
Helphand describes and illustrates the work of American landscape designer Halprin (1916-2009), saying that more than other American landscape designers, he embraced values of Frederick Law Olmsted such as promoting a reform agenda and championing nature as an uplifting moral force.
Belle Isle, the nation's largest island park within a city, was designed by Frederick law Olmsted, landscape architect of New York's Central Park.
Pioneer landscape architect and journalist Frederick Law Olmsted, who created the urban park movement and the world-famous Central Park of New York, wrote how public spaces have more value as green spaces: 'Foliage and sunlight disinfect the air, while trees provide shade and beauty.
Designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, a public plaza in the city park will surround the entire area that constitutes the center, which will include three buildings - a museum, forum and library on Chicago's South Side.
The official historian and photographer for Central Park Conservancy (the private organization that operates the park for the city of New York), Miller notes that everything from its lakes, ponds, and streams to boulder-ridden woodlands and expansive meadows is the work of its 19th-century codesigners, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux.
Lewinnek presents Riverside, the carefully designed garden suburban creation of Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, as a contrast to Chicago's nineteenth-century industrial, working-class suburbs.
In 1895, Elmwood staff hired landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted to improve the cemetery's grounds.
Influenced by their own and the nation's experience of war and the devastated landscapes of the South, Frederick Law Olmsted and John Muir sought solace and meaning in nature's redemptive powers.
Landscape architect and park pioneer Frederick Law Olmsted lamented of San Francisco in 1866, "The most popular place of resort is a burial ground on a high elevation scourged by the wind with no trees or turf.
Paxton's 1847 Birkenhead Park vision attracted the attention of American landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted who arrived by ship in Liverpool in 1850.
The grounds were originally developed by Frederick Law Olmsted, who also co-designed Central Park in New York City and Elm Park in Worcester.