free market

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free market

n.
An economic market in which supply and demand are not regulated or are regulated with only minor restrictions.

free market

n
(Economics)
a. an economic system that allows supply and demand to regulate prices, wages, etc, rather than government policy
b. (as modifier): a free-market economy.

free′ mar′ket


n.
an economic market regulated by the forces of supply and demand.
[1905–10]

free market

Trade which flows freely between countries without barriers such as tariffs and quotas.
References in periodicals archive ?
For additional emphasis, the authors throw in a generic argument for free markets, originating from Aristotelian thought and also based also on the idea that young children from a very early age recognize property rights.
They claim instead that a movement to free markets will enable a nation to develop economically.
Paul Krugman's August 10 op-ed attempts to mock advocates of unregulated free markets and, unsurprisingly, makes a pathetically weak case against them.
Polanyi maintains that removing regulation to recreate self-regulating free markets is based on a fallacy; such free markets never existed, because "the market" cannot exist without ongoing control by the state.
NNA - Mirror Advantage Global Travel Retail Report Company announced Thursday during its annual report that Beirut International Airport's duty free market ranked fifth among other 55 international companies specialized in managing the world free markets.
The great persuasion; reinventing free markets since the Depression.
The most fundamental defense of free markets is not to be found in a materialistic or utilitarian assessment.
For this reason, it poses a threat to free markets and the global economy.
It's telling that there hasn't been a big backlash against liberal reformers in Estonia, the country that has gone furthest in the transition from communism to free markets.
By disclaimer, I am a conservative, a successful small-business owner, a proponent of free markets and limited government, and a believer in the individual.
They have lived their lives in a brave new world of ample liquidity, full employment, and seemingly forever free markets.
Which is to say, two decades after the majority of Latin American countries adopted the recommendations of the Washington Consensus--a free-market therapy long propounded by the United States--this book recommends that the continent give neoliberal policies a fresh chance, apparently forgetting that the most demanding promoter of free markets, the United States itself, hasn't removed the barriers protecting its own farmers and industries from foreign competition.