freemasonry

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Related to Free-masonry: illuminati

free·ma·son·ry

 (frē′mā′sən-rē)
n.
1. Freemasonry The institutions, precepts, and rites of the Freemasons.
2. Spontaneous fellowship and sympathy among a number of people.

freemasonry

(ˈfriːˌmeɪsənrɪ)
n
natural or tacit sympathy and understanding

Freemasonry

(ˈfriːˌmeɪsənrɪ)
n
1. the institutions, rites, practices, etc, of Freemasons
2. Freemasons collectively

free•ma•son•ry

(ˈfriˌmeɪ sən ri)

n.
1. secret or tacit brotherhood.
2. (cap.) the principles, practices, etc., of Freemasons.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.freemasonry - a natural or instinctive fellowship between people of similar interests; "he enjoyed the freemasonry of the Press"
companionship, fellowship, society, company - the state of being with someone; "he missed their company"; "he enjoyed the society of his friends"
2.freemasonry - Freemasons collectivelyFreemasonry - Freemasons collectively    
secret society - a society that conceals its activities from nonmembers
Freemason, Mason - a member of a widespread secret fraternal order pledged to mutual assistance and brotherly love
Translations

freemasonry

[ˈfriːˌmeɪsnrɪ] Nmasonería f, francmasonería f (fig) → compañerismo m, camaradería f

freemasonry

[ˈfriːmeɪsənri] nfranc-maçonnerie ffree of charge adv [work, provide] → gratuitement; [get] → gratuitement
to be available free of charge → être gratuit(e)free pass npasse mfree period nheure f de permanencefree port nport m franc

freemasonry

[ˈfriːˌmeɪsnrɪ] nmassoneria
References in classic literature ?
de Narbonne, one of the old noblesse, with the morals, manners and name of that interest, saying that it was indispensable to send to the old aristocracy of Europe men of the same connection, which, in fact, constitutes a sort of free-masonry.
There is also very little on Hamilton's alleged links to Free-masonry - though Dr North thinks this was "under-explored".
Douglass, in Fanuzzi's words, provided "a tweak" at Martin Delany and the legacy of Primus and Prince Hall when he "condemned 'the weak and glittering follies of odd-fellowship and free-masonry,' fraternal institutions through which African Americans historically created their public culture.