freewriting


Also found in: Wikipedia.

free·writ·ing

 (frē′rī′tĭng)
n.
A writing exercise in which a person writes quickly and continuously, with a free association of ideas, especially as a means of initiating a more focused composition.

free′write′ intr.v.

freewriting

(ˈfriːˌraɪtɪŋ)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a free and unstructured style of writing
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For the prewriting activity, we were amazed to learn that more students chose the freewriting option over the graphic organizer option (37% chose the freewrite versus 14% for the graphic organizer as displayed in Appendix A).
I was able to introduce the idea of freewriting and the extension of this--3-stage free-writing.
I've long cherished his unique form of focused freewriting (an exercise to be used only after students are practiced and comfortable with pure freewriting--nonstop, private, and no topic).
Responses included considering their purpose and task, doing appropriate research for the project, considering the audience, using appropriate verbal conventions, making suitable textual selections, and freewriting the development of their ideas.
get started with freewriting and other brainstorming techniques;
Effects of word processing, synthesized word processing and collaborative freewriting on the written language of learning disabled students.
Some strategies for generating ideas, such as freewriting and looping, cubing and brainstorming, were used to foster self-assessment.
In Metcalf and Simon's Proprioceptive Writing[TM] method, as the sentences unfold out on the page, writers are asked not to purge their thinking as they might with Elbow's freewriting method but rather to engage it by hearing, feeling, and entering certain words already thought and written: asking, writing out, and then answering in writing "What do I mean by--?
Skinner offers sound instruction in the art of writing, suggestions for freewriting exercises, and thoughts on how to revise works in progress.
Yet university writing pedagogy, as Harvey underscored above, often continues to encourage student writers, even after bursts of freewriting or brainstorming to get some preliminary ideas jotted down, to be conscious at all costs when they compose, to plan carefully, to organize their ideas and their information in a linear way, to discipline the unconscious or set it aside--to distrust it.
I'm freewriting in the beige shadow of a high window.
His efforts involve convincing white educators to engage in dialog on the continuing effects of that legacy, instructor modeling, and freewriting as a means of developing such a voice.