French


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Related to French: France, French words

French

 (frĕnch)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of France or its people or culture.
2. Of or relating to the French language.
n.
1. The Romance language of France, parts of Switzerland and Belgium, and other countries formerly under French influence or control.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The people of France.
3. Informal Coarse or vulgar language: Pardon my French.

[Middle English, from Old English frencisc, Frankish, from Franca, Frank; see Frank.]

french

 (frĕnch)
tr.v. frenched, french·ing, french·es
1. To cut (green beans, for example) into thin strips before cooking.
2. To trim fat or bone from (a chop, for example).
3. or French
a. Slang To give a French kiss to.
b. Vulgar Slang To perform oral sex on.

[From French.]

French

(frɛntʃ)
n
1. (Languages) the official language of France: also an official language of Switzerland, Belgium, Canada, and certain other countries. It is the native language of approximately 70 million people; also used for diplomacy. Historically, French is an Indo-European language belonging to the Romance group. See also Old French, Anglo-French
2. (Peoples) the French (functioning as plural) the natives, citizens, or inhabitants of France collectively
3. (Brewing) See French vermouth
adj
4. (Placename) relating to, denoting, or characteristic of France, the French, or their language.
5. (Peoples) relating to, denoting, or characteristic of France, the French, or their language.
6. (Languages) relating to, denoting, or characteristic of France, the French, or their language.
7. (Peoples) (in Canada) of or relating to French Canadians
[Old English Frencisc French, Frankish; see Frank]
ˈFrenchness n

French

(frɛntʃ)
n
(Biography) Sir John Denton Pinkstone, 1st Earl of Ypres. 1852–1925, British field marshal in World War I: commanded the British Expeditionary Force in France and Belgium (1914–15); Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (1918–21)

French

(frɛntʃ)

n.
1. a Romance language spoken in France, parts of Belgium and Switzerland, and present or former French or Belgian possessions, as Quebec, various islands of the Antilles and the Indian Ocean, and countries of the Maghreb and West and Central Africa, where it functions as an auxiliary language. Abbr.: F
2. (used with a pl. v.)
a. the inhabitants of France.
b. natives of France or persons of French ancestry.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to France or its inhabitants.
4. of or pertaining to French or its speakers.
v.t.
5. (often l.c.) to cut (snap beans) lengthwise into thin strips before cooking.
6. (often l.c.) to trim the meat from the end of (a rib chop).
7. Slang. to short-sheet (a bed).
[before 1150; Middle English Frensh, French, Old English Frenc(i)sc; see frank1]
French′ness, n.

French

(frɛntʃ)

n.
Daniel Chester, 1850–1931, U.S. sculptor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.french - the Romance language spoken in France and in countries colonized by FranceFrench - the Romance language spoken in France and in countries colonized by France
noblesse oblige - the obligation of those of high rank to be honorable and generous (often used ironically)
Latinian language, Romance language, Romance - the group of languages derived from Latin
Langue d'oil, Langue d'oil French - medieval provincial dialects of French spoken in central and northern France
Langue d'oc, Langue d'oc French - medieval provincial dialects of French formerly spoken in the south of France
Old French - the earliest form of the French language; 9th to 15th century
Norman French, Norman-French, Old North French - the medieval Norman dialect of Old French
Anglo-French, Anglo-Norman - the French (Norman) language used in medieval England
Canadian French - the French language as spoken in Quebec, Canada
Walloon - a dialect of French spoken in Belgium and adjacent parts of France
patois - a regional dialect of a language (especially French); usually considered substandard
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
eminence grise - (French) a person who exercises power or influence in certain areas without holding an official position; "the President's wife is an eminence grise in matters of education"
2.French - the people of France
nation, country, land - the people who live in a nation or country; "a statement that sums up the nation's mood"; "the news was announced to the nation"; "the whole country worshipped him"
3.french - United States sculptor who created the seated marble figure of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. (1850-1931)French - United States sculptor who created the seated marble figure of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. (1850-1931)
Verb1.French - cut (e.g, beans) lengthwise in preparation for cooking; "French the potatoes"
cut - shorten as if by severing the edges or ends of; "cut my hair"
Adj.1.French - of or pertaining to France or the people of France; "French cooking"; "a Gallic shrug"

French

adjective Gallic All the staff are French.
Related words
combining forms Franco-, Gallo-
Translations
Frans
френски
francès
francouzskýfrancouzštinahranolkyFrancouzi
franskpommes frites
francafranca lingvo
prantsuseprantsuse keel
فرانسه
ranskaranskalainenranskan kielisuikaloida
צרפתית
फ़्राँसीसी
francuskiFrancuzi
franciafranciák
francese
bahasa Perancis
Frakkarfranskafranskar kartöflurfransktfranskur
フランスのフランス人フランス語
프랑스 사람프랑스어프랑스의
lingua Francogallica
bulvių traškučiaišparaginės pupelės
franču valodasīki sagriezti kartupeļi
ഫ്രഞ്ച് ഭാഷ
FransFransenfransozenschuttingtaaltongzoenen
francêsfrancesesbeijar de língua
francezăfrancezifranţuzeşteLimba franceză
francoščina
francuskifrancuziфранцузифранцуски
franskfranskafransmänfransoser
Kifaransa
ภาษาฝรั่งเศสเกี่ยวกับชาวฝรั่งเศสชาวฝรั่งเศส
FransızFransızcafransızlaryağda kızartılmış patates
فرانسیسی زبان
tiếng PhápPhápPháp ngữthuộc nước/người/tiếng Pháp

French

[frentʃ]
A. ADJfrancés; [ambassador] → de Francia
B. N
1. (Ling) → francés m
pardon my Frenchcon perdón (de la expresión)
2. the French (= people) → los franceses
C. CPD French bean N (Brit) → judía f verde, ejote m (Mex), poroto m verde (Chile)
French bread Npan m francés
French chalk Njaboncillo m, jabón m de sastre
French doors NPL (US) → puertaventana fsing
French dressing N (Culin) → vinagreta f
French fried potatoes, French fries NPLpatatas fpl fritas, papas fpl fritas (LAm)
French Guiana Nla Guayana Francesa
French horn Ntrompa f de llaves
French kiss Nbeso m en la boca (con la lengua)
French leave Ndespedida f a la francesa
French letter Ncondón m
French loaf Nbarra f de pan francés
French pastry Npastelito m relleno de nata or frutas
French polish N (Brit) → laca f
the French Riviera Nla Riviera francesa
French stick N = French loaf French toast N (Brit) (= toast) → tostada f; (= fried bread in egg) → torrija f
French windows NPLpuertaventana fsing

French

[ˈfrɛntʃ]
adjfrançais(e)
He's French → Il est français.
She's French → Elle est française.
the French parliament → le Parlement français
n (= language) → français m
Do you speak French? → Est-ce que tu parles français?
npl (= people) the French → les FrançaisFrench Academy n
the French Academy → l'Académie f françaiseFrench bean n (British)haricot m vertFrench bread n
a stick of French bread → une baguetteFrench Canadian
adjcanadien(ne) français(e)
nCanadien(ne) français(e) m/fFrench door nporte-fenêtre fFrench dressing nvinaigrette fFrench fried potatoes npl (US)frites fpl, pommes de terre fpl fritesFrench fries nplfrites fpl

French

adjfranzösisch; French teacher (teaches French) → Französischlehrer(in) m(f); (comes from France) → französischer Lehrer, französische Lehrerin; a French dictionaryein Französischwörterbuch nt; he is Frencher ist Franzose; she is Frenchsie ist Französin; the French peopledie Franzosen pl, → das französische Volk
n
(Ling) → Französisch nt; in Frenchauf französisch; to speak FrenchFranzösisch sprechen; excuse my French (hum inf)entschuldigen Sie die Ausdrucksweise
the French pldie Franzosen pl

French

:
French Academy
n the Frenchdie Académie Française
French bean
French bread
nBaguette nt, → Stangenbrot nt
French-Canadian
adj
personfrankokanadisch; she is Frenchsie ist Frankokanadierin
relationsfrankokanadisch, französisch-kanadisch; (Ling) → frankokanadisch, kanadisch-französisch
n
Frankokanadier(in) m(f)
French chalk
French cricket
n dem Kricket ähnliches Kinderspiel
French doors
French dressing
n (Cook)
(Brit: = oil and vinegar) → Vinaigrette f
(US: = sweet, tomato-flavoured dressing) → French Dressing nt
French Equatorial Africa
n (Hist) → Französisch-Äquatorialafrika nt
French fried potatoes, French fries
plPommes frites pl
French Guiana
nFranzösisch-Guayana nt
French Guianan
nFranzösisch-Guayaner(in) m(f)
adjfranzösisch-guayanisch
French horn
n (Mus) → (Wald)horn nt

French

:
French kiss
nZungenkuss m
French knickers
plFrench Knickers pl
French leave
n to take Frenchsich französisch or auf Französisch empfehlen
French letter
n (Brit inf) → Pariser m (inf)
French loaf
nBaguette f
Frenchman
nFranzose m
French marigold
n (Bot) → Studentenblume f, → Tagetes f
French pastry
nBlätterteigteilchen ntmit Obst und Sahne
French pleat
French polish
nMöbelpolitur fmit Schellack
French-polish
vtlackieren
French Revolution
n the Frenchdie Französische Revolution
French Riviera
n the Frenchdie französische Riviera
French roll
n Damenfrisur, bei der das Haar seitlich zurückgekämmt und in einer länglichen Rolle aufgesteckt wird
French seam
n (Sew) → französische Naht
French stick
nBaguette f, → Stangenbrot nt
French toast
n
nur auf einer Seite gerösteter Toast
(with egg) in Ei getunktes gebratenes Brot
French West Africa
n (Hist) → Französisch-Westafrika nt
French windows
plVerandatür f
Frenchwoman
nFranzösin f

French

[frɛntʃ]
1. adjfrancese; (lesson, teacher) → di francese
2. n
a. (language) → francese m
b. (people) the French npli francesi

French

(frentʃ) : French fries (fraiz)
potato chips.
French beans
the long green edible pods of a type of bean.

french

اللغة الفرنسية, فَرَنسيّ francouzský, francouzština fransk französisch γαλλικός, Γάλλος francés ranska, ranskalainen français francuski francese フランスの, フランス人 프랑스 사람, 프랑스의 Frans fransk, franskmann francuski, Francuz francês французский, французский язык fransk, franska เกี่ยวกับชาวฝรั่งเศส, ภาษาฝรั่งเศส Fransız thuộc nước/người/tiếng Pháp, tiếng Pháp 法国人, 法国的

French

n. [language] francés; [native] francés, francesa;
a. francés, francesa.
French   
References in classic literature ?
There was ice cream, actually two dishes of it, pink and white, and cake and fruit and distracting french bonbons and, in the middle of the table, four great bouquets of hot house flowers.
He studied French and went to an art school, hoping to develop a faculty he had for drawing.
He kept an alcohol lamp in his room, and a French coffee-pot, and his wife made coffee for him at any hour of the night he happened to want it.
Meanwhile he held on to his modest position in a mercantile house in New Orleans, where an equal familiarity with English, French and Spanish gave him no small value as a clerk and correspondent.
When it is remembered that the Dutch (who first settled New York), the English, and the French, all gave appellations to the tribes that dwelt within the country which is the scene of this story, and that the Indians not only gave different names to their enemies, but frequently to themselves, the cause of the confusion will be understood.
Duquesne, eleven other Frenchmen, and some of their own chiefs, and marched up within view of our fort, with British and French colours flying; and having sent a summons to me, in his Britannick Majesty's name, to surrender the fort, I requested two days consideration, which was granted.
Fairfax, who brought up the rear, had, with characteristic unselfishness, contented himself with a French workman's blue blouse and a pair of white duck trousers.
At the head of the stairs, however, she met Hepzibah, who, it being still early, invited her into a room which she would probably have called her boudoir, had her education embraced any such French phrase.
Much as the modern French duel is ridiculed by certain smart people, it is in reality one of the most dangerous institutions of our day.
In the French revolution of July 1830, and in the English reform agitation, these aristocracies again succumbed to the hateful upstart.
The French were afraid that, unless their colonies should be better defended than heretofore, another war might deprive them of the whole.
Since I last wrote to you I have left that hotel, and come to live in a French family.