impressionism

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Related to French Impressionism: Impressionism in art

im·pres·sion·ism

 (ĭm-prĕsh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Impressionism A theory or style of painting originating and developed in France during the 1870s, characterized by concentration on the immediate visual impression produced by a scene and by the use of unmixed primary colors and small strokes to simulate actual reflected light.
2. A literary style characterized by the use of details and mental associations to evoke subjective and sensory impressions rather than the re-creation of objective reality.
3. Music A style of art music of the late 1800s and early 1900s, often evoking a dreamy mood and characterized by modal or whole-tone scales, rich and often dissonant harmonies in unconventional progressions, and the avoidance of traditional forms.

impressionism

(ɪmˈprɛʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) (often capital) a movement in French painting, developed in the 1870s chiefly by Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, and Sisley, having the aim of objectively recording experience by a system of fleeting impressions, esp of natural light effects
2. (Art Terms) the technique in art, literature, or music of conveying experience by capturing fleeting impressions of reality or of mood

im•pres•sion•ism

(ɪmˈprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. (usu. cap.) a style of late 19th-century painting characterized chiefly by short brush strokes of bright colors in immediate juxtaposition to represent the effect of light on objects.
2. a style of literature that emphasizes mood and sensory impressions.
3. a late 19th-century and early 20th-century style of musical composition in which subtle harmony, rhythm, and tonal color are used to evoke moods and impressions.
[1880–85]

Impressionism

a movement in the late 19th century in French painting, characterized by the goal of reproducing an impression of a subject by use of reflected light and color and the blurring of outlines. — Impressionist, n., adj.Impressionistic, adj.
See also: Art

impressionism

1. A musical technique or movement that shared the aim of impressionism in painting, that is, to capture and convey an impression of changing reality or fleeting mood. The main exponent of this style was the French composer, Claude Debussy (1862–1918).
2. (1874–1886) Centering on a diverse group of eight artists, including Cézanne, Renoir, Manet, and Monet, who held eight exhibitions between 1874 and 1886, the movement derives its name from a painting by Monet, Impression: Sunrise. Impressionists were concerned with light and its effects, and the use of “broken” color.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impressionism - a school of late 19th century French painters who pictured appearances by strokes of unmixed colors to give the impression of reflected lightImpressionism - a school of late 19th century French painters who pictured appearances by strokes of unmixed colors to give the impression of reflected light
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Translations
impresszionizmus
impresjonizm

impressionism

[ɪmˈpreʃənɪzəm] N (Art) → impresionismo m

Impressionism

impressionism [ɪmˈprɛʃənɪzəm] nimpressionnisme m

impressionism

impressionism

[ɪmˈprɛʃəˌnɪzm] n (Art) → impressionismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Szymanowski's First String Quartet, written in 1917, is a magic blend of late German romanticism and French impressionism, and there is nothing quite like it in the quartet repertoire.
Christian Svarfvar is presently working with BIS Records on a new album with composers of the French impressionism, to be released later this fall.
4 NATIONAL GALLERY OF SCOTLAND THE Scottish National Gallery is one of the most popular attractions in Edinburgh, boasting sculpture, paintings and furniture that range from the Italian Renaissance to French Impressionism.
Nelsons, though, went beyond Scriabin's gushing Expressionism and big climaxes - all delivered by a supercharged orchestra in dazzling form - to explore the more subtle aspects of the score and its indebtedness to French impressionism.
Witten shares that for a time Teherepnin's friends teasingly called hint "Debussy Ravelovich," a nickname supported I the hints of French impressionism in the meditative Idylle, the third piece.
1392) striving to particularize feeling, the changing meaning of the arch motive in Italian Renaissance art, contained emotion and the hostility of darkness in Rembrandt and the Baroque, and French impressionism as heir to the classical tradition and its encounter with Japanese "Pictures of the Floating World.
The author says Rachel Petit "was the mother of Camille Pissarro, often called the father of French impressionism.
PROGRAMME Gershwin with French impressionism and there were bound to be fireworks.
Najmi paints with passion as his paintings remind us of French Impressionism.
An example of Flemish music in which French impressionism forms a much stronger influence can be found in Arthur Meulemans' oeuvre.
Owner David Wesley Yates is an art enthusiast, but says he is not particularly keen on Claude Monet, the father of French Impressionism, many of whose best-loved subjects, notably his Waterlilies series, were painted at his garden in Giverny, to the north west of Paris.