impressionism

(redirected from French Impressionists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to French Impressionists: Impressionism in art, Impressionisme, Impressionist art

im·pres·sion·ism

 (ĭm-prĕsh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Impressionism A theory or style of painting originating and developed in France during the 1870s, characterized by concentration on the immediate visual impression produced by a scene and by the use of unmixed primary colors and small strokes to simulate actual reflected light.
2. A literary style characterized by the use of details and mental associations to evoke subjective and sensory impressions rather than the re-creation of objective reality.
3. Music A style of art music of the late 1800s and early 1900s, often evoking a dreamy mood and characterized by modal or whole-tone scales, rich and often dissonant harmonies in unconventional progressions, and the avoidance of traditional forms.

impressionism

(ɪmˈprɛʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) (often capital) a movement in French painting, developed in the 1870s chiefly by Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, and Sisley, having the aim of objectively recording experience by a system of fleeting impressions, esp of natural light effects
2. (Art Terms) the technique in art, literature, or music of conveying experience by capturing fleeting impressions of reality or of mood

im•pres•sion•ism

(ɪmˈprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. (usu. cap.) a style of late 19th-century painting characterized chiefly by short brush strokes of bright colors in immediate juxtaposition to represent the effect of light on objects.
2. a style of literature that emphasizes mood and sensory impressions.
3. a late 19th-century and early 20th-century style of musical composition in which subtle harmony, rhythm, and tonal color are used to evoke moods and impressions.
[1880–85]

Impressionism

a movement in the late 19th century in French painting, characterized by the goal of reproducing an impression of a subject by use of reflected light and color and the blurring of outlines. — Impressionist, n., adj.Impressionistic, adj.
See also: Art

impressionism

1. A musical technique or movement that shared the aim of impressionism in painting, that is, to capture and convey an impression of changing reality or fleeting mood. The main exponent of this style was the French composer, Claude Debussy (1862–1918).
2. (1874–1886) Centering on a diverse group of eight artists, including Cézanne, Renoir, Manet, and Monet, who held eight exhibitions between 1874 and 1886, the movement derives its name from a painting by Monet, Impression: Sunrise. Impressionists were concerned with light and its effects, and the use of “broken” color.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impressionism - a school of late 19th century French painters who pictured appearances by strokes of unmixed colors to give the impression of reflected lightImpressionism - a school of late 19th century French painters who pictured appearances by strokes of unmixed colors to give the impression of reflected light
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Translations
impresszionizmus
impresjonizm

impressionism

[ɪmˈpreʃənɪzəm] N (Art) → impresionismo m

Impressionism

impressionism [ɪmˈprɛʃənɪzəm] nimpressionnisme m

impressionism

impressionism

[ɪmˈprɛʃəˌnɪzm] n (Art) → impressionismo
References in periodicals archive ?
The three day classical music festival is dedicated to the musical genius of the French Impressionists as well as a celebration of the 150[sup.
In fact, we heard Debussy's Prelude a l'apres-mid d'un faune, commonly regarded as an innovation in music to match that of the French Impressionists in visual art and very similar in its effects.
Caroline Bodimead, Charlotte Beresford, Ellen Brookes and Elizabeth Garside, with special guest Elly Gosling, will present The Colours Of Spring, music inspired by French Impressionists, Irish Poets and the English countryside.
Afour-day Asian music festival, free public dance nights in a floodlit Victoria Square and an exhibition of work by Van Gogh and other French impressionists are just some of the artistic delights in store if Birmingham is named the UK's first City of Culture.
Christie's can lay claim to many of the auction records for American Impressionists, including that for Mary Cassatt, the artist most closely associated with the French Impressionists.
This would correspond to the period when Monet's influence on Sargent would have been greatest and, thus, this painting again serves as a reminder of the purpose of the entire exhibition--to trace the relationships between the French Impressionists and the Americans who knew them, learned from them, and followed them.
National Museums Liverpool's French Impressionists exhibition, at the Lady Lever, in Port Sunlight, earlier this year was curated in collaboration with
A spokesman for National Museums Merseyside says: "This exceptional exhibition of 13 works - including examples from Liverpool's Walker gallery - shows some wonderful example of the achievements of the French impressionists in their ability to capture colour, light and movement.
Like fellow American painters Maurice Prendergast, Mary Cassatt, Ernest Lawson and Childe Hassam, Horton's style and subject matter is heavily indebted to Monet and the French Impressionists.
The heritage of the French impressionists, sadly, is a bit hidden these days," said Mothron.
Thirty works by well-known French Impressionists are showcased in this volume, which accompanied an exhibition held at the Nelson-Atkins Museum in 2007.
He's not one to take many chances, and his manner meshes well with some kinds of music--Ravel, for instance, Debussy, and the French impressionists.