francese

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fran·cese

 (frăn-sĕs′)
adj.
Dredged in flour, dipped in beaten egg, sautéed, and often served with a lemon butter sauce: veal francese.
n.
A porous French bread with a crispy crust, baked in a rectangular loaf and often used for sandwiches.

[Italian francese, French, from Old Italian, from Old Provenç franses, from Vulgar Latin *francēnsis, of the Franks, from Latin Francī, the Franks.]
References in classic literature ?
True, my father and I used to have grave conversations about lessons and teachers and the French language and grammar; yet we were all very happy and contented together.
Crawley, as a diplomatist, was exceedingly proud of his own skill in speaking the French language (for he was of the world still), and not a little pleased with the compliments which the governess continually paid him upon his proficiency.
This book proves how little hold the French language had upon the English people, for although our land had been ruled by Frenchmen for a hundred and fifty years, there are very few words in Layamon that are French or that are even made from French.
They say there is no word for "home" in the French language.
In fact, the unknown spoke with that impetuosity which is the principal character of English accentuation, even among men who speak the French language with the neatest purity.
Here by intermarriage with the native women they rapidly developed into a race which while retaining all their original courage and enterprise took on also, together with the French language, the French intellectual brilliancy and flexibility and in manners became the chief exponent of medieval chivalry.
Charles Darnay was established in England as a higher teacher of the French language who was conversant with French literature.
It seems she happened to be in want of a French lady to give lessons in geography, history, grammar, and composition, in the French language.
But in the interests of our noble French language and of the Academy--"
returned the savage, speaking also, though imperfectly, in the French language.
It marked our final abandonment of the French language.
That Mrs Kenwigs, impelled by gratitude, or ambition, or maternal pride, or maternal love, or all four powerful motives conjointly, had taken secret conference with Mr Kenwigs, and had finally returned to propose that Mr Johnson should instruct the four Miss Kenwigses in the French language as spoken by natives, at the weekly stipend of five shillings, current coin of the realm; being at the rate of one shilling per week, per each Miss Kenwigs, and one shilling over, until such time as the baby might be able to take it out in grammar.