French window


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Related to French window: casement window

French window

n.
1. A pair or one of a pair of windows extending to the floor and opening in the middle.
2. A casement window.

French′ win′dow


n.
one of a pair of casement windows extending to the floor and usu. giving access, as from a room to a porch.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.French window - a French door situated in an exterior wall of a buildingFrench window - a French door situated in an exterior wall of a building
French door - a light door with transparent or glazed panels extending the full length
References in classic literature ?
At that moment a well remembered voice floated through the open French window near at hand:
It had a French window, which opened on the terrace overlooking the garden and the grounds.
After a glance at the documents awaiting his notice--with his head bent low over the table, the old man's sight for print or writing being defective at night--he opens the French window and steps out upon the leads.
He was seated by the French window opening upon the veranda, as if to secure a retreat in case of an emergency.
It was after dinner, and through the open French window of the dining-room a clear view was to be had of the tennis court and the players.
Large open French window at back, looking on to garden.
He showed me out through his own French window, which had been open all this time.
Come in, Tom; come in," he added, stepping in at the French window.
Vanborough beckoned to Blanche to come to her, and pointed toward the French window opening to the floor.
I was at home at that hour and writing in my study; and although my French windows face towards Ottershaw and the blind was up (for I loved in those days to look up at the night sky), I saw nothing of it.
She opened the French windows, and they stepped out on to the long, broad stone promenade.
But the cream- coloured house (supposed to be modelled on the private hotels of the Parisian aristocracy) was there as a visible proof of her moral courage; and she throned in it, among pre-Revolutionary furniture and souvenirs of the Tuileries of Louis Napoleon (where she had shone in her middle age), as placidly as if there were nothing peculiar in living above Thirty-fourth Street, or in having French windows that opened like doors instead of sashes that pushed up.

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