Frenchwoman


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French·wom·an

 (frĕnch′wo͝om′ən)
n.
1. A woman who is a native or inhabitant of France.
2. A woman of French ancestry.

French•wom•an

(ˈfrɛntʃˌwʊm ən)

n., pl. -wom•en.
a woman who is a native or inhabitant of France.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Frenchwoman - a person of French nationality
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Gaul, frog - a person of French descent
Parisian - a native or resident of Paris
Breton - a native or inhabitant of Brittany (especially one who speaks the Breton language)
Savoyard - a resident of Savoy
Angevin, Angevine - a resident of Anjou
Norman - an inhabitant of Normandy
Translations
Francouzka
franskmand
ranskalainen nainen
Francuskinja
フランス人女性
프랑스 여자
fransyska
หญิงฝรั่งเศส
phụ nữ Pháp

Frenchwoman

[ˈfrentʃˌwʊmən] N (Frenchwomen (pl)) → francesa f

Frenchwoman

[ˈfrɛntʃwʌmən] nFrançaise f

Frenchwoman

[ˈfrɛntʃˌwʊmən] n (-women (pl)) → francese f

Frenchwoman

فَرَنسِيَّة Francouzka franskmand Französin Γαλλίδα francesa ranskalainen nainen Française Francuskinja francese フランス人女性 프랑스 여자 Française fransk dame Francuzka francesa француженка fransyska หญิงฝรั่งเศส Fransız kadın phụ nữ Pháp 法国女人
References in classic literature ?
Esther was a Frenchwoman, who had lived with`Madame', as she called her mistress, for many years, and who rather tyrannized over the old lady, who could not get along without her.
This lady, I suppose, had our chair all to herself, and used to sit in it during those brief intervals when a young Frenchwoman can be quiet enough to sit in a chair.
If you can persuade Henry to marry, you must have the address of a Frenchwoman.
It was said of her that she was a Frenchwoman of good birth who, living with her mother, possessed a colossal fortune.
She was a mere adjunct in the twilight life of her aunt, a Frenchwoman, and her uncle, the orange merchant, a Basque peasant, to whom her other uncle, the great man of the family, the priest of some parish in the hills near Tolosa, had sent her up at the age of thirteen or thereabouts for safe keeping.
She is a hard, clever Frenchwoman, who would like to amuse herself and enjoy her Paris, and she must be bored to death at passing all her time in the midst of stupid English people who mumble broken French at her.
My Lady's maid is a Frenchwoman of two and thirty, from somewhere in the southern country about Avignon and Marseilles, a large-eyed brown woman with black hair who would be handsome but for a certain feline mouth and general uncomfortable tightness of face, rendering the jaws too eager and the skull too prominent.
They were alone in the hotel but for a fat Frenchwoman of middle age, a Rabelaisian figure with a broad, obscene laugh.
Before they reached the room from which the sounds of the clavichord came, the pretty, fair haired Frenchwoman, Mademoiselle Bourienne, rushed out apparently beside herself with delight.
In her snowy-frilled cap she reminded one of that delightful Frenchwoman whom we have all seen marketing, basket on arm.
She was a Frenchwoman, and, on being appealed to, she settled the question in the swift, easy, rational French way.
It is impossible otherwise to account for the extraordinary blindness of perception which (to give one instance only) makes nine Englishmen out of ten who visit France come back declaring that they have not seen a single pretty Frenchwoman, in or out of Paris, in the whole country.