Freud


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Related to Freud: Anna Freud

Freud

 (froid), Anna 1895-1982.
Austrian-born British psychoanalyst noted for her application of psychoanalysis to child therapy.

Freud

, Sigmund 1856-1939.
Austrian physician and founder of psychoanalysis who theorized that the symptoms of hysterical patients represent forgotten and unresolved infantile psychosexual conflicts. His psychoanalytic theories, which initially met with hostility, profoundly influenced 20th-century thought.

Freud

(frɔɪd)
n
1. (Biography) Anna. 1895–1982, Austrian psychiatrist: daughter of Sigmund Freud and pioneer of child psychoanalysis
2. (Biography) Sir Clement. 1924–2009, British broadcaster, writer, politician, and chef; best known as a panellist on the radio game show Just a Minute; grandson of Sigmund Freud
3. (Biography) Lucian. 1922–2011, British painter, esp of nudes and portraits; grandson of Sigmund Freud
4. (Biography) Sigmund (ˈziːkmʊnt). 1856–1939, Austrian psychiatrist; originator of psychoanalysis, based on free association of ideas and analysis of dreams. He stressed the importance of infantile sexuality in later development, evolving the concept of the Oedipus complex. His works include The Interpretation of Dreams (1900) and The Ego and the Id (1923)

Freud

(frɔɪd)

n.
1. Anna, 1895–1982, British psychoanalyst, born in Austria (daughter of Sigmund Freud).
2. Lucian, born 1932, British painter, born in Germany.
3. Sigmund, 1856–1939, Austrian neurologist: founder of psychoanalysis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Freud - Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939)Freud - Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939)
References in classic literature ?
The connection of dreams, irrational beliefs and foolish actions with unconscious wishes has been brought to light, though with some exaggeration, by Freud and Jung and their followers.
Returning from this digression to our main topic, namely, the criticism of "consciousness," we observe that Freud and his followers, though they have demonstrated beyond dispute the immense importance of "unconscious" desires in determining our actions and beliefs, have not attempted the task of telling us what an "unconscious" desire actually is, and have thus invested their doctrine with an air of mystery and mythology which forms a large part of its popular attractiveness.
It is not necessary to suppose, as Freud seems to do, that every unconscious wish was once conscious, and was then, in his terminology, "repressed" because we disapproved of it.
only imaginary, as Freud puts it, but is so obviously scripted and
David Bakan's SIGMUND FREUD AND THE JEWISH MYSTICAL TRADITION (0486437671, $16.
Said's Freud and the Non-European is an attempt to read Freud's Moses and Monotheism in the light of contemporary israeliPalestinian politics.
Esther Freud first visited Walberswick, a village on the Suffolk coast in England, 30 years ago, when she was a young actress living in London and fed up with city life.
SO Lord Freud doesn't think the disabled are worth the minimum wage - what a damn cheek
LABOUR will tomorrow table a Commons vote of no confidence in disability jibe Tory Lord Freud.
LABOUR are demanding that Lord Freud come to Parliament to explain his suggestion that some disabled workers are "not worth" the minimum wage.
Lord Freud is indicative of all that is wrong with this Government's policies and he should resign.
As Freud acknowledged, he acquired a "daimon," a wild force, a creature who (like the daimons inhabiting ancient literature) inspired him to dare, to step boldly outside prescribed thinking, and to admit that he possessed certain impulses that no truly respectable nineteenth-century citizen of Vienna should for a moment entertain.