Freud


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Related to Freud: Anna Freud

Freud

 (froid), Anna 1895-1982.
Austrian-born British psychoanalyst noted for her application of psychoanalysis to child therapy.

Freud

, Sigmund 1856-1939.
Austrian physician and founder of psychoanalysis who theorized that the symptoms of hysterical patients represent forgotten and unresolved infantile psychosexual conflicts. His psychoanalytic theories, which initially met with hostility, profoundly influenced 20th-century thought.

Freud

(frɔɪd)
n
1. (Biography) Anna. 1895–1982, Austrian psychiatrist: daughter of Sigmund Freud and pioneer of child psychoanalysis
2. (Biography) Sir Clement. 1924–2009, British broadcaster, writer, politician, and chef; best known as a panellist on the radio game show Just a Minute; grandson of Sigmund Freud
3. (Biography) Lucian. 1922–2011, British painter, esp of nudes and portraits; grandson of Sigmund Freud
4. (Biography) Sigmund (ˈziːkmʊnt). 1856–1939, Austrian psychiatrist; originator of psychoanalysis, based on free association of ideas and analysis of dreams. He stressed the importance of infantile sexuality in later development, evolving the concept of the Oedipus complex. His works include The Interpretation of Dreams (1900) and The Ego and the Id (1923)

Freud

(frɔɪd)

n.
1. Anna, 1895–1982, British psychoanalyst, born in Austria (daughter of Sigmund Freud).
2. Lucian, born 1932, British painter, born in Germany.
3. Sigmund, 1856–1939, Austrian neurologist: founder of psychoanalysis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Freud - Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939)Freud - Austrian neurologist who originated psychoanalysis (1856-1939)
References in classic literature ?
The connection of dreams, irrational beliefs and foolish actions with unconscious wishes has been brought to light, though with some exaggeration, by Freud and Jung and their followers.
Returning from this digression to our main topic, namely, the criticism of "consciousness," we observe that Freud and his followers, though they have demonstrated beyond dispute the immense importance of "unconscious" desires in determining our actions and beliefs, have not attempted the task of telling us what an "unconscious" desire actually is, and have thus invested their doctrine with an air of mystery and mythology which forms a large part of its popular attractiveness.
It is not necessary to suppose, as Freud seems to do, that every unconscious wish was once conscious, and was then, in his terminology, "repressed" because we disapproved of it.
The distinguished literary critic Frederick Crews has written an extraordinarily brilliant, profound, detailed, and judicious book about the first fifty years of the life of Sigmund Freud (1856 to about 1910) that shows the exact means by which the Freud enterprise, legend, establishment, and influence were created.
The Sigmund Freud Collection at the Library of Congress has been digitized and now is online with more than 20,000 items, containing the personal papers of Freud (1856-1939), the neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis, whose ideas of the unconscious and theories on sex, repression, transference, and religion profoundly influenced 20th-century Western thought.
In anticipation of these others, I offer Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) and Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), both of whom will be discussed later in the paper as examples of two investigators who seized the moment.
Given this problematic use of his source, Scherer's excavation of Freud's "archaeOrientalism" (a compost of "archaeological metaphor, Orientalist discourse, and anti-Semitic stereotype" 72) less uncovers a Lei fossil--as Freud identifies "circumcision" in Moses and Monotheisms quest for the Egyptian Moses--that betrays Freud's ambivalences toward his own Jewish identifications than digs up a Cardiff Giant of Scherer's own making.
Correspondence, 1904-1938: Sigmund Freud and Anna Freud.
A THIRD woman has claimed she was sexually abused by Clement Freud and demanded he be posthumously stripped of his knighthood.
He provides background on Freud and Jung, presents the views of those who believe there was an affair and those who do not, evaluates the evidence, and explores the relationships between Freud and Minna and Martha, showing how they differed and arguing that these differences are key to understanding the affair.
Esther Freud first visited Walberswick, a village on the Suffolk coast in England, 30 years ago, when she was a young actress living in London and fed up with city life.
SO Lord Freud doesn't think the disabled are worth the minimum wage - what a damn cheek