unconscious mind

(redirected from Freudian unconscious)
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Noun1.unconscious mind - that part of the mind wherein psychic activity takes place of which the person is unawareunconscious mind - that part of the mind wherein psychic activity takes place of which the person is unaware
mind, psyche, nous, brain, head - that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head"
superego - (psychoanalysis) that part of the unconscious mind that acts as a conscience
id - (psychoanalysis) primitive instincts and energies underlying all psychic activity
References in periodicals archive ?
Rojack has broken through the social mask, but he must now work through all the horrors of the Freudian unconscious, Reich's level two, before he can reach the biological core.
Hades thus functions as a trope for the Freudian unconscious and throughout his writing Freud relied on analogies drawn from the underworld.
A Passivity Prior to Passive and Active: Merleau-Ponty's Re-Reading of the Freudian Unconscious and Looking at Lascaux, FIONA HUGHES
Subsequently, I will analyse Lacan's reframing of the Freudian unconscious, paying special attention to references to molecular biology as an emerging bridge from [psi] to [beta].
Understanding the Freudian unconscious as central to the psychoanalytic process of listening, understanding and responding, the purpose of the work is to reintroduce the analyst as a modern day visionary shaman, offering transmutation and healing more in the realm of the magical than the scientific.
Freudian Unconscious and Cognitive Neuroscience: From Unconscious Fantasies to Neural Algorithms.
Suzuki's account of spontaneity forgets the long training that precedes the possibility of Zen 'spontaneous' acting; and his notion of a deep self is closer to the Freudian unconscious than Buddhist ideals of emptiness and absence of self.
Sartre depicts this aspect of the Freudian unconscious through the example of an impulse to steal a book.
Freudian unconscious and cognitive neuroscience; from unconscious fantasies to neural algorithms.
The Subversion of the Subject and the Dialectic of Desire in the Freudian Unconscious.
The result is that in reading this, we travel from thoughts on oral tradition through to the complexities of trying to describe the variant forms that writers have used, particularly when Modernism at first appeared to have stolen the show and there was perhaps little more to do after the discovery and use of the Freudian unconscious.