friar

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Related to Friars: Franciscan friars, friars balsam

fri·ar

 (frī′ər)
n. Abbr. Fr.
A member of a usually mendicant Roman Catholic order.

[Middle English frere, from Old French, from Latin frāter, brother; see bhrāter- in Indo-European roots.]

fri′ar·ly adj.

friar

(ˈfraɪə)
n
(Christian Churches, other) a member of any of various chiefly mendicant religious orders of the Roman Catholic Church, the main orders being Black Friars (Dominicans), Grey Friars (Franciscans), White Friars (Carmelites), and Austin Friars (Augustinians). See also Black Friar, Grey Friar, White Friar, Augustinian
[C13 frere, from Old French: brother, from Latin frāter brother]
ˈfriarly adj

fri•ar

(ˈfraɪ ər)

n.
a man who is a member of one of the mendicant religious orders founded in the Middle Ages, as the Carmelites, Franciscans, or Dominicans.
[1250–1300; Middle English frier, frere brother < Old French frere < Latin frāter brother]
fri′ar•ly, adj.
monk, friar - A monk stays in a monastery; a friar does not.
See also related terms for monk.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.friar - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on almsfriar - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on alms
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
Carmelite, White Friar - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the white cloak of the Carmelite order; mendicant preachers
Black Friar, Blackfriar, Dominican, friar preacher - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the black mantle of the Dominican order
Franciscan, Grey Friar - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the grey habit of the Franciscan order
Augustinian - a Roman Catholic friar or monk belonging to one of the Augustinian monastic orders

friar

noun monk, brother, religious, prior, abbot He is a travelling Franciscan friar.
Translations

friar

[ˈfraɪəʳ] Nfraile m; (before name) → fray m
black friardominico m
grey friarfranciscano m
white friarcarmelita m

friar

[ˈfraɪər] nmoine m, frère m

friar

nMönch m; Friar JohnBruder John; Black FriarsDominikaner pl; Grey FriarsFranziskaner pl; White FriarsKarmeliter pl

friar

[ˈfraɪəʳ] nfrate m
References in classic literature ?
There were ruddy, brown-faced, broad-girthed Spanish Friars, and winking from their shelves in wanton slyness at the girls as they went by, and glanced demurely at the hung-up mistletoe.
While they were thus talking there appeared on the road two friars of the order of St.
Passepartout saw, too, begging friars, long-robed pilgrims, and simple civilians, with their warped and jet-black hair, big heads, long busts, slender legs, short stature, and complexions varying from copper-colour to a dead white, but never yellow, like the Chinese, from whom the Japanese widely differ.
That evening and thereafter for a week they gave the Chapins the official history, as one gives it to lodgers, of Friars Pardon the house and its five farms.
I wondered now why he didn't slip his hands into the sleeves of his coat, you know, as begging Friars do when they come for a subscription.
An abbot and a dozen beggarly friars is all we have.
The Asile de Nuit is a large stone building where pauper and vagabond may get a bed for a week, provided their papers are in order and they can persuade the friars in charge that they are workingmen.
There was a tinker, two barefoot friars, and a party of six of the King's foresters all clad in Lincoln green, and all of them were quaffing humming ale and singing merry ballads of the good old times.
     "Black friars in this world, fried black in the next.
Alleyne passed him swiftly by, for he had learned from the monks to have no love for the wandering friars, and, besides, there was a great half-gnawed mutton bone sticking out of his pouch to prove him a liar.
But although Robin fought against the clergy, the friars and monks who did wrong, he did not fight against religion.
The Dominican and Franciscan friars, also, who had come to England in the thirteenth century, soon after the foundation of their orders in Italy, and who had been full at first of passionate zeal for the spiritual and physical welfare of the poor, had now departed widely from their early character and become selfish, luxurious, ignorant, and unprincipled.