Friesland

(redirected from Frieslands)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Fries·land

 (frēz′lənd, -lănd′, frēs′-)
A region of northern Europe on the North Sea between the Scheldt and Weser Rivers. The Frisians, a Germanic people, were conquered by the Franks in the eighth century. A portion of the area is now a province, also called Friesland, of the northern Netherlands.

Friesland

(ˈfriːzlənd; Dutch ˈfriːslɑnt)
n
1. (Placename) a province of the N Netherlands, on the IJsselmeer and the North Sea: includes four of the West Frisian Islands; flat, with sand dunes and fens (under reclamation), canals, and lakes. Capital: Leeuwarden. Pop: 640 000 (2003 est). Area: 3319 sq km (1294 sq miles). Official and Frisian name: Fryslân
2. (Placename) an area comprising the province of Friesland in the Netherlands along with the regions of East Friesland and North Friesland in Germany

Fries•land

(ˈfriz lənd, -ˌlænd, ˈfris-)

n.
a province in the N Netherlands. 599,104; 1431 sq. mi. (3705 sq. km). Cap.: Leeuwarden.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Friesland - the western part of the ancient region of Frisia in northern Europe on the North Sea between the Scheldt river and the Weser riverFriesland - the western part of the ancient region of Frisia in northern Europe on the North Sea between the Scheldt river and the Weser river; part of this region is now a province in the Netherlands
Frisia - an ancient region of northwestern Europe including the Frisian Islands
2.Friesland - one of the northernmost provinces of the Netherlands
Holland, Kingdom of The Netherlands, Nederland, Netherlands, The Netherlands - a constitutional monarchy in western Europe on the North Sea; half the country lies below sea level
Translations
Frísko

Friesland

[ˈfriːzlənd] NFrisia f

Friesland

nFriesland nt
References in classic literature ?
entitled A Whaling Voyage to Spitzbergen in the ship Jonas in the Whale, Peter Peterson of Friesland, master.
Those turf-heaps, mounds of potter's clay, melted at the word of the soldiers like butter in the frying-pans of Friesland housewives.
We have to confess, to the disgrace of our hero and of floriculture, that of his two affections he felt most strongly inclined to regret the loss of Rosa; and when, at about three in the morning, he fell asleep overcome with fatigue, and harassed with remorse, the grand black tulip yielded precedence in his dreams to the sweet blue eyes of the fair maid of Friesland.