frieze

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frieze1
Ionic order entablature
A. cornice
B. frieze
C. architrave
D. entablature

frieze 1

 (frēz)
n. Architecture
1. A plain or decorated horizontal part of an entablature between the architrave and cornice.
2. A decorative horizontal band, as along the upper part of a wall in a room.

[French frise, from Medieval Latin frisium, frigium, embroidery, from Latin Phrygium (opus), Phrygian (work), from Phrygia.]

frieze 2

 (frēz)
n.
1. A coarse, shaggy woolen cloth with an uncut nap.
2. A dense, low-pile surface, as in carpeting, resembling such cloth. In both senses also called frisé.

[Middle English frise, from Old French, from Medieval Latin (pannī) frīsiī, woolen (garments), from pl. of Frīsius, Frisian.]

frieze

(friːz)
n
1. (Architecture) architect
a. the horizontal band between the architrave and cornice of a classical entablature, esp one that is decorated with sculpture
b. the upper part of the wall of a room, below the cornice, esp one that is decorated
2. (Art Terms) any ornamental band or strip on a wall
[C16: from French frise, perhaps from Medieval Latin frisium, changed from Latin Phrygium Phrygian (work), from Phrygia Phrygia, famous for embroidery in gold]

frieze

(friːz)
n
(Textiles) a heavy woollen fabric with a long nap, used for coats, etc
[C15: from Old French frise, from Middle Dutch friese, vriese, perhaps from Vriese Frisian]

frieze1

(friz)

n.
1. the part of an entablature in classical architecture between the architrave and the cornice, often decorated with sculpture in low relief.
2. a decorative, often carved band, as near the top of a wall or piece of furniture.
[1555–65; < Middle French frise]

frieze2

(friz)

n.
1. a heavy, napped woolen cloth for coats.
2. a heavy fabric with uncut pile loops, made of wool, mohair, cotton, or synthetic fibers.
[1350–1400; Middle English frise < Old French; see frieze1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frieze - an architectural ornament consisting of a horizontal sculptured band between the architrave and the cornicefrieze - an architectural ornament consisting of a horizontal sculptured band between the architrave and the cornice
architectural ornament - (architecture) something added to a building to improve its appearance
entablature - (architecture) the structure consisting of the part of a classical temple above the columns between a capital and the roof
2.frieze - a heavy woolen fabric with a long nap
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations
إِفْريز
vlys
frise
myndræma
frizas
frīze
vlys
duvar süsüfriz

frieze

[friːz] N (Archit) → friso m; (= painting) → fresco m

frieze

[ˈfriːz] nfrise f, bordure f

frieze

1
n (Archit: = picture) → Fries m; (= thin band)Zierstreifen m

frieze

2
n (Tex) → Fries m

frieze

[friːz] n (Archit) → fregio

frieze

(friːz) noun
a narrow strip around the walls of a room, building etc near the top, usually decorated with pictures, carving etc. The walls were decorated with a frieze of horses.
References in classic literature ?
No rays from the holy heaven come down On the long night-time of that town; But light from out the lurid sea Streams up the turrets silently - Gleams up the pinnacles far and free - Up domes - up spires - up kingly halls - Up fanes - up Babylon-like walls - Up shadowy long-forgotten bowers Of scultured ivy and stone flowers - Up many and many a marvellous shrine Whose wreathed friezes intertwine The viol, the violet, and the vine.
The friezes ornamented with arabesques, and the pediments which crowned the pilasters, conferred richness and grace on every part of the building, while the domes which surmounted the whole added proportion and majesty.
He had availed himself, in this heavy undertaking, of the experience of a certain wandering eastern mechanic, who, by exhibiting a few soiled plates of English architecture, and talking learnedly of friezes, entablatures, and particularly of the composite order, had obtained a very undue influence over Richard’s taste in everything that pertained to that branch of the fine arts.
At the same moment he noticed a pair of stockings, round the tops of which one of the daintiest artists in the land had wrought an exquisite little frieze.
That Cheyne boy's the biggest nuisance aboard," said a man in a frieze overcoat, shutting the door with a bang.
Soldiers were continually rushing backwards and forwards near it, and he saw two of them and a man in a frieze coat dragging burning beams into another yard across the street, while others carried bundles of hay.
After so much self-colour and self-denial, Margaret viewed with relief the sumptuous dado, the frieze, the gilded wall-paper, amid whose foliage parrots sang.
At the moment of the blow, the stern had been thrown into the air, and the man (having his hands free, and for all he was encumbered with a frieze overcoat that came below his knees) had leaped up and caught hold of the brig's bowsprit.
Each put on a coarse straw bonnet, with strings of coloured calico, and a cloak of grey frieze.
On a slope to Gertrude's right hand, Sallust's House, with its cinnamon-colored walls and yellow frieze, gave a foreign air to the otherwise very English landscape.
A vine wanders along the whole side of the house, a pleasant strip of green like a frieze, between the two stories.
They have used a horizontal breadth for a frieze, and that adds wonderfully to the confusion.