frigate

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frig·ate

 (frĭg′ĭt)
n.
1. A warship that is smaller than a destroyer and used primarily for escort duty.
2. A high-speed, medium-sized sailing war vessel of the 1600s, 1700s, and 1800s.
3. Obsolete A fast, light vessel, such as a sailboat.

[French frégate, from Italian fregata.]

frigate

(ˈfrɪɡɪt)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a medium-sized square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuries
2. (Nautical Terms)
a. Brit a warship larger than a corvette and smaller than a destroyer
b. US (formerly) a warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
c. US a small escort vessel
[C16: from French frégate, from Italian fregata, of unknown origin]

frig•ate

(ˈfrɪg ɪt)

n.
1. a fast naval vessel of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, generally having a lofty ship rig and being heavily armed on one or two decks.
2. a modern warship.
[1575–85; < Middle French frégate < Italian fregata, Sicilian fragata]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frigate - a medium size square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuriesfrigate - a medium size square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuries
combat ship, war vessel, warship - a government ship that is available for waging war
2.frigate - a United States warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
guided missile frigate - a frigate that carries guided missiles
combat ship, war vessel, warship - a government ship that is available for waging war
Translations

frigate

[ˈfrɪgɪt] N (Naut) → fragata f

frigate

[ˈfrɪgət] n (modern)frégate f

frigate

n (Naut) → Fregatte f

frigate

[ˈfrɪgɪt] n (Naut) → fregata
References in classic literature ?
Until further information, therefore, I shall maintain it to be a sea-unicorn of colossal dimensions, armed not with a halberd, but with a real spur, as the armoured frigates, or the `rams' of war, whose massiveness and motive power it would possess at the same time.
One bright afternoon, a gig, gaily bedizened with streamers, was observed to shove off from the side of one of the French frigates, and pull directly for our gangway.
Why, Squire Doolittle, I’ve been at the whipping of two of them in one day—clean built, snug frigates with standing royals and them new-fashioned cannonades on their quarters— such as, if they had only Englishmen aboard of them, would have fout the devil.
He admitted that it was a specious invention in time of peace, but looked hopefully for the day when sails should come back again on ten-thousand-ton frigates with hundred-and-ninety-foot booms.
Nor did he know it was the head of La Perouse, the doughty old navigator, who had left his bones, the bones of his crews, and the bones of his two frigates, the Astrolabe and the Boussole, on the shores of the cannibal Solomons.
In a small, tossing group, the three men edged for positions like frigates contemplating battle.
Where unrecorded names and navies rust, and untold hopes and anchors rot; where in her murderous hold this frigate earth is ballasted with bones of millions of the drowned; there, in that awful water-land, there was thy most familiar home.
On one of them was painted by some very poor hand the Rape of Helen, when the bold guest carried her off from Menelaus, and on the other was the story of Dido and AEneas, she on a high tower, as though she were making signals with a half sheet to her fugitive guest who was out at sea flying in a frigate or brigantine.
Why, in the first place, his yacht is not a ship, but a bird, and he would beat any frigate three knots in every nine; and if he were to throw himself on the coast, why, is he not certain of finding friends everywhere?
The captain of a frigate in the harbor, and two or three civil officers under the Crown, were also there.
Soon after this," said Grandfather, "Sir William Phips quarrelled with the captain of an English frigate, and also with the collector of Boston.
And for a good quarter of a mile, from the dockyard gate to the farthest corner, where the old housed-in hulk, the President (drill-ship, then, of the Naval Reserve), used to lie with her frigate side rubbing against the stone of the quay, above all these hulls, ready and unready, a hundred and fifty lofty masts, more or less, held out the web of their rigging like an immense net, in whose close mesh, black against the sky, the heavy yards seemed to be entangled and suspended.