fry

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fry 1

 (frī)
v. fried (frīd), fry·ing, fries (frīz)
v.tr.
1. To cook over direct heat in hot oil or fat.
2. Slang To destroy (electronic circuitry) with excessive heat or current: "a power surge to the computer that fried a number of sensitive electronic components" (Erik Sandberg-Diment).
v.intr.
1. To be cooked in a pan over direct heat in hot oil or fat.
2. Slang To undergo execution in an electric chair.
n. pl. fries (frīz)
1. A french fry: ordered fries as a side dish.
2. A dish of a fried food.
3. A social gathering at which food is fried and eaten: a fish fry.

[Middle English frien, from Old French frire, from Latin frīgere.]

fry 2

 (frī)
n.
1. pl. fry
a. A recently hatched fish.
b. A young salmon living in fresh water that is older than an alevin and younger than a parr or smolt.
c. A young animal of certain other groups, such as frogs.
2. pl. fry or fries An individual, especially a young or insignificant person: "These pampered public school boys ... had managed to evade the long prison sentences that lesser fry were serving" (Noel Annan).

[Middle English fri, probably from Anglo-Norman frie, from Old French frier, froyer, to rub, spawn, from Latin fricāre, to rub.]

fry

(fraɪ)
vb, fries, frying or fried
1. (Cookery) (when: tr, sometimes foll by up) to cook or be cooked in fat, oil, etc, usually over direct heat
2. (intr) informal to be excessively hot
3. slang chiefly US to kill or be killed by electrocution, esp in the electric chair
n, pl fries
4. (Cookery) a dish of something fried, esp the offal of a specified animal: pig's fry.
5. (Cookery) US and Canadian a social occasion, often outdoors, at which the chief food is fried
6. (Cookery) informal Brit the act of preparing a mixed fried dish or the dish itself
[C13: from Old French frire, from Latin frīgere to roast, fry]

fry

(fraɪ)
pl n
1. (Zoology) the young of various species of fish
2. (Zoology) the young of certain other animals, such as frogs
3. young children. See also small fry
[C14 (in the sense: young, offspring): perhaps via Norman French from Old French freier to spawn, rub, from Latin fricāre to rub]

Fry

(fraɪ)
n
1. (Biography) Christopher. 1907–2005, English dramatist; author of the verse dramas A Phoenix Too Frequent (1946), The Lady's Not For Burning (1948), and Venus Observed (1950)
2. (Biography) Elizabeth. 1780–1845, English prison reformer and Quaker
3. (Biography) Roger Eliot. 1866–1934, English art critic and painter who helped to introduce the postimpressionists to Britain. His books include Vision and Design (1920) and Cézanne (1927)
4. (Biography) Stephen (John). born 1957, British writer, actor, and comedian; his novels include The Liar (1991) and The Stars' Tennis Balls (2000)

fry1

(fraɪ)

v. fried, fry•ing, v.t.
1.
a. to cook in fat or oil usu. over direct heat.
b. to pan-broil: to fry bacon.
2. Slang. to execute by electrocution in an electric chair.
v.i.
3. to undergo cooking in fat or oil.
4. Slang. to die by electrocution in an electric chair.
n.
5. a dish of fried food.
6. a strip of French-fried potato.
7. a party or gathering at which the chief food is fried, often outdoors: a fish fry.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French frire < Latin frīgere to roast]
fry′a•ble, adj.

fry2

(fraɪ)

n., pl. fry.
1. the young of fish.
2. the young of various other animals, as frogs.
3. individuals, esp. children: games for the small fry.
[1325–75; Middle English frie, fry seed, descendant]

Fry

(fraɪ)

n.
Christopher, born 1907, English playwright.

Fry

 the young or brood of fishes or other animals or insects, including oysters and bees; people held in contempt collectively—Johnson, 1755. See also brood, swarm.
Examples: fry of authors, 1641; of bees [young bees], 1577; of Christmas books, 1861; of Catholics, 1607; of ditches, 1600; of eel spawn; of fish [young], 1389; of foul decays; of gnats, 1613; of islands, 1652; of oysters [young].

fry


Past participle: fried
Gerund: frying

Imperative
fry
fry
Present
I fry
you fry
he/she/it fries
we fry
you fry
they fry
Preterite
I fried
you fried
he/she/it fried
we fried
you fried
they fried
Present Continuous
I am frying
you are frying
he/she/it is frying
we are frying
you are frying
they are frying
Present Perfect
I have fried
you have fried
he/she/it has fried
we have fried
you have fried
they have fried
Past Continuous
I was frying
you were frying
he/she/it was frying
we were frying
you were frying
they were frying
Past Perfect
I had fried
you had fried
he/she/it had fried
we had fried
you had fried
they had fried
Future
I will fry
you will fry
he/she/it will fry
we will fry
you will fry
they will fry
Future Perfect
I will have fried
you will have fried
he/she/it will have fried
we will have fried
you will have fried
they will have fried
Future Continuous
I will be frying
you will be frying
he/she/it will be frying
we will be frying
you will be frying
they will be frying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been frying
you have been frying
he/she/it has been frying
we have been frying
you have been frying
they have been frying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been frying
you will have been frying
he/she/it will have been frying
we will have been frying
you will have been frying
they will have been frying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been frying
you had been frying
he/she/it had been frying
we had been frying
you had been frying
they had been frying
Conditional
I would fry
you would fry
he/she/it would fry
we would fry
you would fry
they would fry
Past Conditional
I would have fried
you would have fried
he/she/it would have fried
we would have fried
you would have fried
they would have fried

fry

To cook food in fat or oil over direct heat.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Fry - English painter and art critic (1866-1934)
Bloomsbury Group - an inner circle of writers and artists and philosophers who lived in or around Bloomsbury early in the 20th century and were noted for their unconventional lifestyles
2.Fry - English dramatist noted for his comic verse dramas (born 1907)
3.fry - a young person of either sexfry - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
child's body - the body of a human child
juvenile, juvenile person - a young person, not fully developed
bairn - a child: son or daughter
buster - a robust child
changeling - a child secretly exchanged for another in infancy
child prodigy, infant prodigy, wonder child - a prodigy whose talents are recognized at an early age; "Mozart was a child prodigy"
foster child, foster-child, fosterling - a child who is raised by foster parents
scamp, imp, monkey, rapscallion, rascal, scalawag, scallywag - one who is playfully mischievous
kiddy - a young child
orphan - a child who has lost both parents
peanut - a young child who is small for his age
picaninny, piccaninny, pickaninny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Black child
poster child - a child afflicted by some disease or deformity whose picture is used on posters to raise money for charitable purposes; "she was the poster child for muscular dystrophy"
kindergartener, kindergartner, preschooler - a child who attends a preschool or kindergarten
silly - a word used for misbehaving children; "don't be a silly"
sprog - a child
bambino, toddler, yearling, tot - a young child
urchin - poor and often mischievous city child
street child, waif - a homeless child especially one forsaken or orphaned; "street children beg or steal in order to survive"
Verb1.fry - be excessively hot; "If the children stay out on the beach for another hour, they'll be fried"
heat up, hot up, heat - gain heat or get hot; "The room heated up quickly"
2.fry - cook on a hot surface using fat; "fry the pancakes"
cookery, cooking, preparation - the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
cook - transform and make suitable for consumption by heating; "These potatoes have to cook for 20 minutes"
frizzle - fry something until it curls and becomes crisp
deep-fat-fry - fry in deep fat; "deep-fry the potato chips"
griddle - cook on a griddle; "griddle pancakes"
pan-fry - fry in a pan; "pan-fry the dumplings"
deep-fry, french-fry - cook by immersing in fat; "french-fry the potatoes"
stir fry - fry very quickly over high heat; "stir-fry the vegetables in a wok"
saute - fry briefly over high heat; "saute the onions"
3.fry - kill by electrocution, as in the electric chair; "The serial killer was electrocuted"
kill - cause to die; put to death, usually intentionally or knowingly; "This man killed several people when he tried to rob a bank"; "The farmer killed a pig for the holidays"
Translations
يَقْليصِغار السَّمَك
smažitpotěr
stegesvitsefiskeyngelsmåfisk
paistaapaistuaranskalaiset perunatsulaakäristää
pržiti
smáfiskarsteikja
油で揚げる
튀기다
ceptmazuļi
frytkausmażyć
rybia násada
cvreti
steka
ทอด
kızartmakyavru sürüsü
rán

fry

1 [fraɪ]
A. VT (Culin) → freír
B. VIfreírse
C. Nfritada f

fry

2 [fraɪ] N (Fishing) → pececillos mpl
see also small D

fry

[ˈfraɪ] [fried] [ˈfraɪd] (pt, pp)
vtfaire frire
Fry the onions for 5 minutes → Faites frire les oignons pendant cinq minutes.
vi (= get burnt) [person] → griller

fry

1
pl (= fish)kleine Fische pl

fry

2
vt
meat etc(in der Pfanne) braten; to fry an eggein Spiegelei machen, ein Ei in die Pfanne schlagen
(US inf: = electrocute) → auf dem elektrischen Stuhl hinrichten
vi
(meat etc)braten; we’re absolutely frying in this heat (inf)wir schmoren (in dieser Hitze) (inf)
n (US) → Barbecue nt

fry

1 [fraɪ] vt & vifriggere

fry

2 [fraɪ] npl (Zool) → avannotti mpl
see also small fry

fry1

(frai) verb
to cook in hot oil or fat. Shall I fry the eggs or boil them?
ˈfrying-pan , (American) ˈfry-pan noun
a shallow pan, usually with a long handle, for frying food in.
out of the frying-pan into the fire
from a difficult or dangerous situation into a worse one. His first marriage was unhappy but his second was even more unhappy – it was a real case of out of the frying-pan into the fire.

fry2

(frai) noun
a swarm of young, especially of fish.
small fry
unimportant people or things. The local politicians are just small fry.

fry

يَقْلي smažit stege braten τηγανίζω freír paistaa frire pržiti friggere 油で揚げる 튀기다 frituren steke usmażyć fritar жарить steka ทอด kızartmak rán 油炸

fry

v. freír.

fry

vt (pret & pp fried) freír
References in classic literature ?
So we went over to where the canoe was, and while he built a fire in a grassy open place amongst the trees, I fetched meal and bacon and coffee, and coffee-pot and frying-pan, and sugar and tin cups, and the nigger was set back considerable, because he reckoned it was all done with witchcraft.
They built a fire against the side of a great log twenty or thirty steps within the sombre depths of the forest, and then cooked some bacon in the frying-pan for sup- per, and used up half of the corn "pone" stock they had brought.
Put a piece of butter the size of your thumb into the frying-pan.
The terrible announcement that the baby had been taken in the act of putting a doll's frying-pan into his mouth, and was more than suspected of having swallowed a fictitious turkey, glued on a wooden platter.
The cook threw a frying-pan after her as she went out, but it just missed her.
laughed dark Car's mother, stroking her moustache as she explained laconically: "Out of the frying-pan into the fire
The little boy scraped away at his cauldron with more spirit than ever; and, to crown all, an old woman had just placed on the tripod a frying-pan of grease, which hissed away on the fire with a noise similar to the cry of a troop of children in pursuit of a masker.
He put his leg into the jam, and he worried the teaspoons, and he pretended that the lemons were rats, and got into the hamper and killed three of them before Harris could land him with the frying-pan.