fugitive

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fu·gi·tive

 (fyo͞o′jĭ-tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Running away or fleeing, as from the law.
b. Of or relating to fugitives: "My brother ... was on the fugitive squad, tracking draft dodgers" (James Carroll).
2.
a. Lasting only a short time; fleeting: "[His] house and burial place ... should be visited by all who profess even a fugitive interest in political economy" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
b. Difficult to comprehend or retain; elusive: fugitive solutions to the problem.
c. Given to change or disappearance; perishable: fugitive beauty; fugitive tint.
d. Of temporary interest: "Apart from juvenilia and fugitive verses, his poetic legacy consists of only some seventy poems" (Daniel Hoffman).
3. Wandering or tending to wander; vagabond: "We also chanced upon fugitive monks, penniless pilgrims and tradesmen" (Jeanne Marie Laskas).
n.
1. A person who flees, especially from a legal process, persecution, or danger.
2. Something fleeting or ephemeral.

[Middle English fugitif, from Old French, from Latin fugitīvus, from fugitus, past participle of fugere, to flee.]

fu′gi·tive·ly adv.
fu′gi·tive·ness n.

fugitive

(ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv)
n
1. a person who flees
2. a thing that is elusive or fleeting
adj
3. fleeing, esp from arrest or pursuit
4. not permanent; fleeting; transient
5. moving or roving about
[C14: from Latin fugitīvus fleeing away, from fugere to take flight, run away]
ˈfugitively adv
ˈfugitiveness n

fu•gi•tive

(ˈfyu dʒɪ tɪv)

n.
1. a person who is fleeing from prosecution or intolerable circumstances.
adj.
2. having taken flight, or run away: a fugitive convict.
3. fleeting; transitory.
4. dealing with subjects of passing interest, as writings; ephemeral: fugitive essays.
5. wandering, roving, or vagabond.
[1350–1400; Middle English fugitif < Old French < Latin fugitīvus fleeing]
fu′gi•tive•ly, adv.
fu′gi•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fugitive - someone who flees from an uncongenial situation; "fugitives from the sweatshops"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.fugitive - someone who is sought by law officers; someone trying to elude justice
absconder - a fugitive who runs away and hides to avoid arrest or prosecution
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
escapee - someone who escapes
Adj.1.fugitive - lasting for a markedly brief timefugitive - lasting for a markedly brief time; "a fleeting glance"; "fugitive hours"; "rapid momentaneous association of things that meet and pass"; "a momentary glimpse"
short - primarily temporal sense; indicating or being or seeming to be limited in duration; "a short life"; "a short flight"; "a short holiday"; "a short story"; "only a few short months"

fugitive

noun
1. runaway, refugee, deserter, escapee, runagate (archaic) He was a fugitive from justice.
adjective
1. momentary, short, passing, brief, fleeing, temporary, fleeting, unstable, short-lived, transient, flitting, ephemeral, transitory, evanescent, fugacious, flying Love is as fugitive and insubstantial as smoke, yet we all pursue it.

fugitive

adjective
1. Fleeing or having fled, as from home, confinement, captivity, or justice:
noun
One who flees, as from home, confinement, captivity, or justice:
Translations
هارِب
uprchlík
flygtningflygtig
karkulainenpakolainen
menekülő
flóttamaîur
fugitivus
bėglys
bēglis
vluchtelingvluchtelingevoortvluchtigvoortvluchtige
diffuserømling
begunacbegunicabegunka

fugitive

[ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv]
A. ADJ
1.fugitivo
2. (liter) (= fleeting) → efímero, pasajero
B. Nfugitivo/a m/f; (= refugee) → refugiado/a m/f
fugitive from justiceprófugo/a m/f (de la justicia)

fugitive

[ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv] nfugitif/ive m/f
a fugitive from justice → un fugitif recherché(e) par la justice

fugitive

n (= runaway)Flüchtling m (→ from vor +dat); he is a fugitive from justiceer ist auf der Flucht vor der Justiz
adj
(= escaping)flüchtig; fugitive vehicleFluchtfahrzeug nt
(liter, = fleeting) thought, happiness, hour, visitflüchtig

fugitive

[ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv]
1. nfuggitivo/a, profugo/a; (from prison) → evaso/a
2. adjfuggitivo/a (liter) (fleeting) → fugace, fuggevole

fugitive

(ˈfjuːdʒətiv) noun
a person who is running away (from the police etc). a fugitive from justice.
References in classic literature ?
The savages were so near, that the least motion in one of the horses, or even a breath louder than common, would have betrayed the fugitives.
The vaquero, who was chasing some cattle, was evidently too preoccupied to heed the shouts of her companion, and wheeling round suddenly to intercept one of the deviating fugitives, permitted Christie's escort to dash past him before that gentleman could rein in his excited steed.
She screamed and shouted, too, with a terrific volume of sound, which, doubtless, caused the hearts of the fugitives to quake within them.
What a situation, now, for a patriotic senator, that had been all the week before spurring up the legislature of his native state to pass more stringent resolutions against escaping fugitives, their harborers and abettors!
The bats chased the children a good distance; but the fugitives plunged into every new passage that offered, and at last got rid of the perilous things.
FOR two months the fugitives remained absent; in those two months, Mrs.
And now, when they were all in lively anticipation of "the two villains" being taken, and when the bellows seemed to roar for the fugitives, the fire to flare for them, the smoke to hurry away in pursuit of them, Joe to hammer and clink for them, and all the murky shadows on the wall to shake at them in menace as the blaze rose and sank and the red-hot sparks dropped and died, the pale after-noon outside, almost seemed in my pitying young fancy to have turned pale on their account, poor wretches.
For while they sit contriving, shall the rest, Millions that stand in Arms, and longing wait The Signal to ascend, sit lingring here Heav'ns fugitives, and for thir dwelling place Accept this dark opprobrious Den of shame, The Prison of his Tyranny who Reigns By our delay?
Then a new idea struck the wicked old woman, and hiding herself behind the rock which had sheltered the fugitives, she waited behind it, watching carefully for the moment when the Prince and her daughter should resume their natural forms and continue their journey.
They had been the settlers of thirteen separate and distinct English colonies, along the margin of the shore of the North American Continent; contiguously situated, but chartered by adventurers of characters variously diversified, including sectarians, religious and political, of all the classes which for the two preceding centuries had agitated and divided the people of the British islands--and with them were intermingled the descendants of Hollanders, Swedes, Germans, and French fugitives from the persecution of the revoker of the Edict of Nantes.
There is much controversy about the delivering up of fugitives from service or labor.
The keeper, seeing that the fugitives were now some distance off, once more entreated and warned him as before; but he replied that he heard him, and that he need not trouble himself with any further warnings or entreaties, as they would be fruitless, and bade him make haste.