fulmar

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ful·mar

 (fo͝ol′mər, -mär′)
n.
1. Either of two gull-like birds, Fulmarus glacialis of Arctic regions or F. glacialoides of Antarctic regions, having bluish-gray and white plumage.
2. Any of several similar or related birds.

[Ultimately (via Scots fulmar Scottish Gaelic fulmair) from Old Norse fūlmār : fūll, foul (from the foul-smelling oily liquid that the birds regurgitate as a defense when disturbed ); see pū̆- in Indo-European roots + mār, mew; akin to Old English mǣw.]

fulmar

(ˈfʊlmə)
n
(Animals) any heavily built short-tailed oceanic bird of the genus Fulmarus and related genera, of polar regions: family Procellariidae, order Procellariiformes (petrels)
[C17: of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse fūlmār, from fūll foul + mār gull]

ful•mar

(ˈfʊl mər)

n.
any of several gull-like pelagic birds akin to the shearwaters and petrels, esp. Fulmarus glacialis, of N oceans.
[1690–1700; orig. dial. (Hebrides) < Icelandic fūl stinking, foul + mār gull]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fulmar - heavy short-tailed oceanic bird of polar regionsfulmar - heavy short-tailed oceanic bird of polar regions
petrel - relatively small long-winged tube-nosed bird that flies far from land
Translations
mallemuk
fýll

fulmar

fulmar

[ˈfʊlməʳ] nprocellaria dei ghiacci
References in classic literature ?
The condor lays a couple of eggs and the ostrich a score, and yet in the same country the condor may be the more numerous of the two: the Fulmar petrel lays but one egg, yet it is believed to be the most numerous bird in the world.
North Wales Police's hard-working Rural Crime Team is investigating the deaths of 10 Fulmars on seacliffs near Dwygyfylchi.
It includes the work of the North East Beached Bird Surveys group, which is part of a wider North Sea study of fulmars.
The island off the coast of Antrim is host to 250,000 puffins, fulmars, razorbills, guillemots and kittiwakes all jostling for space on the cliffs.
Nuliajuq also took away the voices of the fulmars so they could not deceive another innocent woman, but they still call and wail in regret.
Although the gannets were, as always, the stars of the show with their perfectly marked faces and beautifully coloured plumage, we also spotted fulmars with chicks, herring gulls, great black backed gulls, lesser black backed gulls, kittiwakes, guillemots and more unusually, a bridled guillemot, which was identified by the white ring around, and stripe behind, the eye.
Families scaled the sheer cliffs to catch gannets, fulmars and puffins and used their oil, feathers and eggs as part payment for their rent.
Serum electrolyte concentrations of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) (n = 9), western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) (n = 6), and common murres (Uria aalge) (n = 25) housed on freshwater while undergoing rehabilitation at the San Francisco Bay Oiled Wildlife Care and Education Center in Fairfield, California, were compared with reference intervals from free-ranging populations.
Among the species most likely to be sighted at Marsden Bay will be breeding kittiwakes, fulmars, razorbills and gulls.
Birds such as albatrosses, shearwaters and fulmars are being accidentally caught by hooks on the lines which can be more than 60 miles long, and dragged underwater where they drown.
These include kittiwakes and fulmars, both of whose populations have declined in recent years.
Other signs of spring include fulmars on their nesting cliffs above Old Colwyn's rainbow bridge and oystercatchers behaving territorially at RSPB Conwy, where large numbers of ducks returned after last month's freeze.