fungus

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fun·gus

 (fŭng′gəs)
n. pl. fun·gi (fŭn′jī, fŭng′gī) or fun·gus·es
Any of numerous spore-producing eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Fungi, which lack chlorophyll and vascular tissue and range in form from a single cell to a mass of branched filamentous hyphae that often produce specialized fruiting bodies. The kingdom includes the yeasts, smuts, rusts, mushrooms, and many molds, excluding the slime molds and the water molds.

[Latin; perhaps akin to Greek spongos, sphongos, sponge.]

fungus

(ˈfʌŋɡəs)
n, pl fungi (ˈfʌŋɡaɪ; ˈfʌndʒaɪ; ˈfʌndʒɪ) or funguses
1. (Plants) any member of a kingdom of organisms (Fungi) that lack chlorophyll, leaves, true stems, and roots, reproduce by spores, and live as saprotrophs or parasites. The group includes moulds, mildews, rusts, yeasts, and mushrooms
2. something resembling a fungus, esp in suddenly growing and spreading rapidly
3. (Pathology) pathol any soft tumorous growth
[C16: from Latin: mushroom, fungus; probably related to Greek spongos sponge]
fungic adj
ˈfungus-ˌlike adj

fun•gus

(ˈfʌŋ gəs)

n., pl. fun•gi (ˈfʌn dʒaɪ, ˈfʌŋ gaɪ)
fun•gus•es.
any member of the kingdom Fungi (or division Thallophyta of the kingdom Plantae), comprising single-celled or multinucleate organisms that live by decomposing and absorbing the organic material in which they grow: includes the mushrooms, molds, mildews, smuts, rusts, and yeasts.
[1520–30; < Latin: fungus; sponge]
fun•gic (ˈfʌn dʒɪk) adj.

fun·gus

(fŭng′gəs)
Plural fungi (fŭn′jī, fŭng′gī)
Any of a wide variety of organisms that reproduce by spores, including the mushrooms, molds, yeasts, and mildews. The spores of most fungi grow a network of slender tubes called hyphae that spread into and feed off of living organisms or dead organic matter. The hyphae also produce reproductive structures, such as mushrooms and other growths. Fungi are grouped as a separate kingdom in taxonomy. See Table at taxonomy.

fungal adjective
Did You Know? There's a fungus among us, as they say. And it's true—they are everywhere. You have no doubt eaten mushrooms, which are fungi. And you have eaten bread, made with yeast, another fungus. Old bread may grow mold, still another fungus. Athlete's foot and a variety of other infections are caused by fungi, but, on the good side, a fungus also produces the medicine penicillin. About 100,000 different species of fungi exist. When you see a light-colored splat on a tree or rock in the woods, it is probably a lichen, which is a fungus and an alga living in a symbiotic relationship, benefiting each other. Fungi are neither plants nor animals; they are different enough to be classified by scientists into their own unique kingdom.

fungus


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(pl. fungi) A member of the kingdom Fungi, a group of nonmotile saprophytes and parasites.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matterfungus - an organism of the kingdom Fungi lacking chlorophyll and feeding on organic matter; ranging from unicellular or multicellular organisms to spore-bearing syncytia
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
immune reaction, immune response, immunologic response - a bodily defense reaction that recognizes an invading substance (an antigen: such as a virus or fungus or bacteria or transplanted organ) and produces antibodies specific against that antigen
pileus, cap - a fruiting structure resembling an umbrella or a cone that forms the top of a stalked fleshy fungus such as a mushroom
volva - cuplike structure around the base of the stalk of certain fungi
hymenium - spore-bearing layer of cells in certain fungi containing asci or basidia
Ceratostomella ulmi, Dutch elm fungus - fungus causing Dutch elm disease
Claviceps purpurea, ergot - a fungus that infects various cereal plants forming compact black masses of branching filaments that replace many grains of the plant; source of medicinally important alkaloids and of lysergic acid
black root rot fungus, Xylaria mali - fungus causing black root rot in apples
dead-man's-fingers, dead-men's-fingers, Xylaria polymorpha - the fruiting bodies of the fungi of the genus Xylaria
sclerotinia - any fungus of the genus Sclerotinia; some causing brown rot diseases in plants
earthball, hard-skinned puffball, puffball, false truffle - any of various fungi of the genus Scleroderma having hard-skinned subterranean fruiting bodies resembling truffles
stalked puffball - mushroom of the genus Tulostoma that resembles a puffball
false truffle - any of various fungi of the family Rhizopogonaceae having subterranean fruiting bodies similar to the truffle
slime mold, slime mould - a naked mass of protoplasm having characteristics of both plants and animals; sometimes classified as protoctists
pond-scum parasite - an aquatic fungus of genus Synchytriaceae that is parasitic on pond scum
potato wart fungus, Synchytrium endobioticum - fungus causing potato wart disease in potato tubers
Saprolegnia ferax, white fungus - a fungus that attacks living fish and tadpoles and spawn causing white fungus disease: a coating of white hyphae on especially peripheral parts (as fins)
white rust - fungus causing a disease characterized by a white powdery mass of conidia
pythium - any fungus of the genus Pythium
Phytophthora citrophthora - causes brown rot gummosis in citrus fruits
Phytophthora infestans - fungus causing late blight in solanaceous plants especially tomatoes and potatoes
clubroot fungus, Plasmodiophora brassicae - a fungus resembling slime mold that causes swellings or distortions of the roots of cabbages and related plants
earth-ball, earthnut, truffle - any of various highly prized edible subterranean fungi of the genus Tuber; grow naturally in southwestern Europe
coral fungus - any of numerous fungi of the family Clavariaceae often brightly colored that grow in often intricately branched clusters like coral
tooth fungus - a fungus of the family Hydnaceae
lichen - any thallophytic plant of the division Lichenes; occur as crusty patches or bushy growths on tree trunks or rocks or bare ground etc.
Fungi, fungus kingdom, kingdom Fungi - the taxonomic kingdom including yeast, molds, smuts, mushrooms, and toadstools; distinct from the green plants
true fungus - any of numerous fungi of the division Eumycota
basidiomycete, basidiomycetous fungi - any of various fungi of the subdivision Basidiomycota
Chinese black mushroom, golden oak mushroom, Lentinus edodes, Oriental black mushroom, shiitake, shiitake mushroom - edible east Asian mushroom having a golden or dark brown to blackish cap and an inedible stipe
Lentinus lepideus, scaly lentinus - a fungus with a scaly cap and white flesh and a ring on the stalk (with scales below the ring); odor reminiscent of licorice
Corticium salmonicolor, pink disease fungus - fungus causing pink disease in citrus and coffee and rubber trees etc
bottom rot fungus, Corticium solani - fungus causing bottom rot in lettuce
Pellicularia filamentosa, potato fungus, Rhizoctinia solani - fungus causing a disease in potatoes characterized by black scurfy spots on the tubers
coffee fungus, Pellicularia koleroga - fungus causing a disease in coffee and some other tropical plants
Volvaria bombycina - a parasite on various trees
mycelium - the vegetative part of a fungus consisting of a mass of branching threadlike hyphae

fungus

noun mould, mushroom, decay, mildew, toadstool The spores of the fungus are able to germinate in oil.

Fungi

agaric, bird's-nest fungus, boletus, bracket fungus, cramp ball, death cap, dry rot, earthstar, elf-cup, ergot, funnel cap, ink-cap, jelly fungus, horn of plenty, liberty cap, mildew, milk cap, miller, mould, mushroom, puffball, rust or rust fungus, shaggy cap, sickener, smut, stinkhorn, sulphur tuft, toadstool, truffle, velvet shank, wax cap, wet rot, wood hedgehog, wood woollyfoot, yeast
Translations
فُطْر
гъба
fong
houba
svamp
fungo
seen
قارچ
sieni
פטריות
gljiva
gombagombaféle
sveppur
きのこ菌類
fungus
grybasfungicidai
piepesēnesēnes
ciupercă
svamp
nấm

fungus

[ˈfʌŋgəs] N (fungi (pl)) → hongo m

fungus

[ˈfʌŋgəs] [fungi] [ˈfʌŋgiː ˈfʌŋgaɪ ˈfʌndʒaɪ] (pl) n
(= plant) → champignon m
(= mould) → moisissure f

fungus

n pl <fungi> (Bot, Med) → Pilz m

fungus

[ˈfʌŋgəs] n (fungi (pl)) [ˈfʌŋgaɪ]fungo; (mould) → muffa

fungus

(ˈfaŋgəs) plurals ˈfungi (-gai) ˈfunguses noun
any of several kinds of soft spongy plants without any leaves or green part. A mushroom is one type of fungus; That tree has a fungus growing on it.
ˈfungicide (-dʒisaid) noun
a substance used to kill fungus.

fun·gus

n. L. hongo.

fungus

n (pl -gi) hongo
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