Furies


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Related to Furies: Eumenides

fu·ry

 (fyo͝or′ē)
n. pl. fu·ries
1.
a. Violent anger; rage. See Synonyms at anger.
b. A fit of anger: "I went into a fury and shouted in his face" (William Least Heat-Moon).
2.
a. Violent or frenzied action: the storm's fury.
b. A violent disturbance or intense period of activity: "The Huns ... moved into Italy, unleashing a fury of destruction" (Arther Ferrill).
3. Fury Greek & Roman Mythology Any of the spirits who pursue and torment the doers of unavenged crimes, identified with the Greek Erinyes.

[Middle English furie, from Old French, from Latin furia, from furere, to rage.]

Furies

(ˈfjʊərɪz)
pl n, sing Fury
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the snake-haired goddesses of vengeance, usually three in number, who pursued unpunished criminals. Also called: Erinyes or Eumenides
Translations

Furies

[ˈfjʊərɪz] npl (Myth) the Furiesle Furie
References in classic literature ?
Heralded by a courier in advance, and by the cracking of his postilions' whips, which twined snake-like about their heads in the evening air, as if he came attended by the Furies, Monsieur the Marquis drew up in his travelling carriage at the posting-house gate.
The postilions, with a thousand gossamer gnats circling about them in lieu of the Furies, quietly mended the points to the lashes of their whips; the valet walked by the horses; the courier was audible, trotting on ahead into the dun distance.
He sits to rest on a rock just within a sacred grove of the Furies and is bidden depart by a passing native.