Furies


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Related to Furies: Eumenides

fu·ry

 (fyo͝or′ē)
n. pl. fu·ries
1.
a. Violent anger; rage. See Synonyms at anger.
b. A fit of anger: "I went into a fury and shouted in his face" (William Least Heat-Moon).
2.
a. Violent or frenzied action: the storm's fury.
b. A violent disturbance or intense period of activity: "The Huns ... moved into Italy, unleashing a fury of destruction" (Arther Ferrill).
3. Fury Greek & Roman Mythology Any of the spirits who pursue and torment the doers of unavenged crimes, identified with the Greek Erinyes.

[Middle English furie, from Old French, from Latin furia, from furere, to rage.]

Furies

(ˈfjʊərɪz)
pl n, sing Fury
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the snake-haired goddesses of vengeance, usually three in number, who pursued unpunished criminals. Also called: Erinyes or Eumenides
Translations

Furies

[ˈfjʊərɪz] npl (Myth) the Furiesle Furie
References in classic literature ?
There were some of the girls who were of her own sort, who were willing to toady to her and flatter her; and these would carry tales about the rest, and so the furies were unchained in the place.
He could only be kept from furies dangerous to himself by being given his own way in every detail.
Heralded by a courier in advance, and by the cracking of his postilions' whips, which twined snake-like about their heads in the evening air, as if he came attended by the Furies, Monsieur the Marquis drew up in his travelling carriage at the posting-house gate.