Fuseli


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Fu·sel·i

 (fyo͞o′zə-lē′), Henry Originally Johann Heinrich Füssli. 1741-1825.
Swiss-born British painter whose works, including The Nightmare (1781), display a fantastic, macabre quality that influenced the surrealists of the 1920s and 1930s.

Fuseli

(ˈfjuːzəlɪ)
n
(Biography) Henry. original name Johann Heinrich Füssli. 1741–1825, British painter, born in Switzerland. His paintings include Nightmare (1782)
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For me at least--in the circumstances then surrounding me--there arose out of the pure abstractions which the hypochondriac contrived to throw upon his canvas, an intensity of intolerable awe, no shadow of which felt I ever yet in the contemplation of the certainly glowing yet too concrete reveries of Fuseli.
Caption: Henry Fuseli, Prince Arthur and the Fairy Queen, 1788.
Shockingly Mad: Henry Fuseli and the Art of Drawing
Another key figure of the time was John Boydell, whose Shakespeare Gallery featured specially commissioned illustrations of the plays by leading artists including Reynolds, Joseph Wright and the eccentric Swiss neo Mannerist, Henry Fuseli.
And the episode of Sita's abduction by Ravana is depicted through a series of nine colour photographs that reference dark symbolist imagery in Hollywood films, the sensuous women in Indian artist Raja Ravi Varma's paintings, Orientalist images of the odalisque, and classical Western paintings such as Poussin's "The Rape of the Sabine Women" and "The Nightmare" by Fuseli.
12) Some of these reimaginings coax the poem's contours into harmonious new forms--among them its numerous illustrations, stretching from Louis Du Guernier and Claude Du Bose, to Henry Fuseli, C.
Featuring paintings of scenes from Shakespeare by major artists of the day, including Henry Fuseli, Joshua Reynolds, and Angelica Kauffmann, the gallery was a popular if not a financial success.
IT IS a tribute to the greatness of these paintings that they evoke so many masters of the past: Giotto, Giovanni Bellini, Masaccio, Blake, Fuseli, Stanley Spencer.
Among the stars of the genre are Joshua Reynolds, Henry Fuseli, George Romney, Richard Dadd, and William Blake.
In their construction and use of narrative, the paintings call to mind the works of Goya and Delacroix and particularly Fuseli with his celebrated painting The Nightmare.
Henry Fuseli is said to have remarked that fellow Romantic William Blake was "damned good to steal from".
To complete his introductory chapter, Whitfield then cites the work of such outstanding artists as Fuseli, Delacroix, and Abbey as somehow representative of the epitome of this change, arguing that "[w]hat these artists were aiming at was not merely to give a plain, simple, instantly recognisable snapshot from some part of a play, but to create an image that was memorable in itself, that became a work of art in its own right--and that, as it did so, might subtly alter the way we view that play" (14).