G20

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Related to G-20: WTO, G-7, G-8

G20

 (jē′twĕn′tē, -twŭn′-)
n.
A group of twenty politically and financially influential countries, including those in the G8. Representatives from these countries meet to discuss economic concerns.

[G(roup of) 20.]

G20

abbreviation for
Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors
References in periodicals archive ?
The G-20 commitment to keep capital flowing in developing countries also will help.
It is therefore understandable that high hopes were placed in the G-20 summit, even though this is an unrepresentative, rather ad hoc group of countries, with no permanent secretariat, a rather poor track record in its short existence, and an uncertain future.
Emerging in 1999, the G-20 is made up of members that cut across North-South dichotomies by including those deemed to be both 'significant industrial' and 'emerging market' economies.
What a stroke of genius to bring the G-20 leaders to Hamburg's spectacular new Elbphilharmonie concert hall, itself a triumph of architectural vision, to be inspired by perhaps the greatest musical work of universal culture, with its message of world harmony.
Prime Minister Modi, in the G-20 summit, called on for a debate in dealing with forced migration and pressed for a comprehensive and cooperative policy framework to distinguish legal migration.
Muestra de ello ha sido la creacion del G-20 (Grupo de los veinte financiero), que en un mismo espacio condenso las relaciones asimetricas de poder entre paises desarrollados y paises en desarrollo.
Given the increasing complexity of economic and political forces and interdependence, the only forum that can achieve something close to global economic governance--or global Ordnungspolitik as we call it in Germany--is the G-20.
The G-20 is known as the annual summit for the heads of states and governors of central banks from 20 major economies.
During Turkey's temporary presidency of the G-20 this past year, the W-20 was formed with the aim of boosting and promoting greater participation by women in the global workforce.
Since Turkey assumed the presidency of the G-20 in December 2014, our approach toward ensuring inclusive and robust growth through collective action has enjoyed the support of the organization's members.
This was the first time that G-20 leaders had actively considered whether the existing international energy architecture, largely created in response to the oil shocks of the 1970s and dominated by the International Energy Agency (IEA), is sufficient to meet the rapidly changing demands of the global energy sector, a sector which now accounts for two-thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions.
Dervis and Drysdale present readers with a collection of essays and scholarly articles that look at the principles of global governance, managing the G-20, the core G-20 economic agenda, and issues that indicate a need for reform in global governance.