Gaelic


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Gael·ic

 (gā′lĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to the Gaels or their culture or languages.
n.
1. Goidelic.
2. Any of the Goidelic languages, especially:
a. Irish.
b. (often găl′ĭk) Scottish Gaelic.

Gaelic

(ˈɡeɪlɪk; ˈɡæl-)
n
(Languages) any of the closely related languages of the Celts in Ireland, Scotland, or (formerly) the Isle of Man. Compare Goidelic
adj
1. (Peoples) of, denoting, or relating to the Celtic people of Ireland, Scotland, or the Isle of Man or their language or customs
2. (Languages) of, denoting, or relating to the Celtic people of Ireland, Scotland, or the Isle of Man or their language or customs
3. (Placename) of, denoting, or relating to the Celtic people of Ireland, Scotland, or the Isle of Man or their language or customs

Gael•ic

(ˈgeɪ lɪk)

n.
2. the Irish and Scottish Gaelic languages collectively.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Gaels or Gaelic.
[1590–1600; Gael + -ic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gaelic - any of several related languages of the Celts in Ireland and ScotlandGaelic - any of several related languages of the Celts in Ireland and Scotland
Celtic, Celtic language - a branch of the Indo-European languages that (judging from inscriptions and place names) was spread widely over Europe in the pre-Christian era
Irish Gaelic, Irish - the Celtic language of Ireland
Scots Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic - the Gaelic of Scotland
Manx - the ancient Gaelic formerly spoken on the Isle of Man; the language is sometimes used on ceremonial occasions
Adj.1.Gaelic - relating to or characteristic of the Celts
Translations
gael
ゲール族ゲール語

Gaelic

[ˈgeɪlɪk]
A. ADJgaélico
B. N (Ling) → gaélico m
C. CPD Gaelic coffee Ncafé m irlandés

Gaelic

[ˈgeɪlɪk ˈgælɪk]
adjgaélique
ngaélique m

Gaelic

adjgälisch
n (Ling) → Gälisch nt

Gaelic

[ˈgeɪlɪk]
1. adjgaelico/a
2. n (language) → gaelico
References in classic literature ?
The Tain gives us vivid pictures of people and things, but it is not full of beauty and of tender imagination like many of the Gaelic stories.
That you can easily do, for it has been translated many times out of the old Gaelic in which it was first written and it has been told so simply that even those of you who are quite young can read it for yourselves.
Then several of the partners and clerks and some of the men, being Scotsmen, were acquainted with the Gaelic, and held long conversations together in that language.
To this we may ascribe many of their whimsical pranks and absurd propositions, and, above all, their mysterious colloquies in Gaelic.
In this sore and irritable mood did the captain pursue his course, keeping a wary eye on every movement, and bristling up whenever the detested sound of the Gaelic language grated upon his ear.
Johnson and others, who had dared to say in their time that the poems of Ossian were not genuine lays of the Gaelic bard, handed down from father to son, and taken from the lips of old women in Highland huts, as Macpherson claimed.
And presently he sat down upon the table, sword in hand; the air that he was making all the time began to run a little clearer, and then clearer still; and then out he burst with a great voice into a Gaelic song.
From 1760 to 1763 Macpherson, then a young Highland Scots schoolmaster, published in rapid succession certain fragments of Gaelic verse and certain more extended works in poetical English prose which, he asserted, were part of the originals, discovered by himself, and translations, of the poems of the legendary Scottish bard Ossian, of the third Christian century.
Poor Sir Charles's head was of a very rare type, half Gaelic, half Ivernian in its characteristics.
The borderland of the brain, where all the monsters are made, moved horribly in the Gaelic O'Brien.
Nevertheless, he spoke quite sensibly, as if there were no Gaelic souls on earth.
126) For example, in "The Stage Irishman Has Come Back," the Gaelic American claimed "for a long period, at least twenty years, the stage Irishman had been relegated to obscurity.