Gaelic

(redirected from Gaelic heritage)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Gael·ic

 (gā′lĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to the Gaels or their culture or languages.
n.
1. Goidelic.
2. Any of the Goidelic languages, especially:
a. Irish.
b. (often găl′ĭk) Scottish Gaelic.

Gaelic

(ˈɡeɪlɪk; ˈɡæl-)
n
(Languages) any of the closely related languages of the Celts in Ireland, Scotland, or (formerly) the Isle of Man. Compare Goidelic
adj
1. (Peoples) of, denoting, or relating to the Celtic people of Ireland, Scotland, or the Isle of Man or their language or customs
2. (Languages) of, denoting, or relating to the Celtic people of Ireland, Scotland, or the Isle of Man or their language or customs
3. (Placename) of, denoting, or relating to the Celtic people of Ireland, Scotland, or the Isle of Man or their language or customs

Gael•ic

(ˈgeɪ lɪk)

n.
2. the Irish and Scottish Gaelic languages collectively.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Gaels or Gaelic.
[1590–1600; Gael + -ic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gaelic - any of several related languages of the Celts in Ireland and ScotlandGaelic - any of several related languages of the Celts in Ireland and Scotland
Celtic, Celtic language - a branch of the Indo-European languages that (judging from inscriptions and place names) was spread widely over Europe in the pre-Christian era
Irish Gaelic, Irish - the Celtic language of Ireland
Scots Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic - the Gaelic of Scotland
Manx - the ancient Gaelic formerly spoken on the Isle of Man; the language is sometimes used on ceremonial occasions
Adj.1.Gaelic - relating to or characteristic of the Celts
Translations
gael
ゲール族ゲール語

Gaelic

[ˈgeɪlɪk]
A. ADJgaélico
B. N (Ling) → gaélico m
C. CPD Gaelic coffee Ncafé m irlandés

Gaelic

[ˈgeɪlɪk ˈgælɪk]
adjgaélique
ngaélique m

Gaelic

adjgälisch
n (Ling) → Gälisch nt

Gaelic

[ˈgeɪlɪk]
1. adjgaelico/a
2. n (language) → gaelico
References in periodicals archive ?
Clann Throndairnis brings together pupils from Staffin and Kilmuir primary schools on Skye as well as parents, members of the local communities and creative, cultural and Gaelic organisations with the single aim of inspiring an appreciation of Gaelic heritage.
But despite its Gaelic heritage, The Gage is not an Irish theme pub, even if some of the dishes, such as roast duck with black pudding hash, hint at robust food inf luences.
She describes how the four masters (historians Micheal O Cleirigh OFM, Cu Choigcriche O Cleirigh, Fearfeasa O Maoil Chonaire, and Cu Choigcriche O Duibhgeannain) collaborated in the production and revision of their history of Ireland in the early seventeenth-century, and how the annals became an important element of the community's Gaelic heritage.