Darwin's finches

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Darwin's finches

pl n
(Animals) the finches of the subfamily Geospizinae of the Galapagos Islands, showing great variation in bill structure and feeding habits: provided Darwin with evidence to support his theory of evolution

Dar′win's finch′es


n. pl.
a group of Galapagos Island finches, esp. of the genus Geospiza, that were observed by Charles Darwin and provide a striking example of speciation.
[1945–50]
References in periodicals archive ?
Charles Darwin's path to evolutionary theory is infinitely more interesting and dramatic when it's paved with Galapagos finches and tortoises than with pages of scientific doctrine.
Ecology becomes central in the second and longest chapter, "A Green Machine," in which a cryptic discussion of the concept of an ecosystem precedes a treatment of standard ecological topics, including adaptation, industrial melanism, the Galapagos finches, niches, and food webs.
introduces Peter and Barbara Grant, whose studies of the Galapagos finches on Daphne Major Island have spanned 39 years.
Recent experiments by Peter and Rosemary Grant of McGill University demonstrated that the average beak size of Galapagos finches changed during years of drought, confirming the power of natural selection at that modest level.
A phylogenetic reanalysis of allozyme variation among populations of Galapagos finches.
After all, Charles Darwin might never have come up with the theory of evolution by natural selection if he hadn't studied the Galapagos finches.