Galenism


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Ga·len·ism

 (gā′lə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The medical system based on the theories or practices of Galen.

Ga′len·ist adj. & n.

Galenism

(ˈɡeɪlɪˌnɪzəm)
n
(Medicine) a system of medicine based on the 84 surviving technical treatises of Galen, including the theory of the four bodily humours
ˈGalenist adj, n

Galenism

the medical system of Galen, a blend of humoralism and Pythagorean number lore. — galenic, adj.
See also: Medical Specialties
References in periodicals archive ?
The sixty colloquies forming part of Orta's book present a medical view moving away from Galenism and Aristotelianism, and based upon modern botany and iatrochemistry.
As Katherine Rowe demonstrates in a reading of Titus Andronicus, early modern Galenism defined the hand as the part of the body that "naturalized personal agency in the human form.
Most of the Scottish authors of the early waters literature had received much of their education at the medical school of Paris, which remained an increasingly rare bastion of Galenism well into the seventeenth century.
Part II: Between Galenism and Aristotelism--Islamic theories of Apoplexy (800-1200).
Therefore, Bright was deeply nationalistic, favoured Paracelsianism and drew heavily upon the influence of religion in medicine, whilst Jorden preferred Galenism, attempted to separate medicine from religion and the supernatural, and dedicated his tract to the Royal College of Physicians.
They generally agree that there was probably less discord in medical practice than in medical theory, and the new sciences of anatomy and physiology, iatrochemistry and iatromechanial theory competed with medieval and early modern Galenism and the remnants of the Aristotelian intellectual edifice and its postulate of the organic integrity of body and soul.
13) On the chemical revolution and the Paracelsian rejection of Galenism, see Debus and Pagel.
However, the controversy aroused by the new knowledge introduced by him, produced enemies since they stood against the galenism, which was accepted and practiced in the scientific circle of the time.
Culpeper's Ghost, Cole wrote that Culpeper had mellowed somewhat toward Galenism during his final illness.
In an essay on the introduction of Galenism into Tudor England, Vivian Nutton emphasizes the close relationship of medical learning to the other natural sciences and its distance from English natural philosophy.
Key words: heredity, inheritance, Galenism, Biology and Enlightenment
Developments in medicine during the Renaissance played a fundamental part in the process of extinction of Galenism.