Old Portuguese

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Related to Galician-Portuguese: Old Portuguese

Old Portuguese

n.
The Portuguese language before the middle of the 1500s.
References in periodicals archive ?
25) As a written performance inaccessible to an audience, acrostics are extremely rare in Galician-Portuguese lyric.
If my conjectural supplement in the first verse of Meogo 5 is correct, we have one more example of the Galician-Portuguese dawn-song, representing a meeting between lovers at dawn (not to be confused with the Provencal or French alba, where lovers part at daybreak).
Galician-Portuguese lyric; King Dinis of Portugal; textual criticism; symbolism; organized sequences of cantigas d'amigo.
Thomas Hart explores the issue of monotony in the Galician-Portuguese cantigas de amor by comparing them to the troubadour canso.
Both descend from a Romance language of the Middle Ages now referred to as Galician-Portuguese.
15) Medieval Galician-Portuguese Poetry: An Anthology (New York and London: Garland, 1992), p.
The medieval Galician-Portuguese lyric takes its name from the language of the poems, not from the nationality of the poets.
There has been a glut of new anthologies of the Galician-Portuguese lyric, in testimony to its abiding importance in Hispanic literature.
This is a substantial volume of thirty essays, mostly in German (just two in French), devoted to a wide range of aspects of the 'woman's voice' in the German Minnesang, in the Galician-Portuguese lyric, and in a number of other relevant literary cultures (ranging from Ireland to Japan).
Many are short occasional pieces, often adopting unexpected forms--no doubt ironically--such as those used by the Galician-Portuguese troubadours.
Although Blackmore could have cited classical culture (from Homer and Aristotle onwards) to advocate that these Renaissance texts use shipwreck as a uniform mode of vituperation, he restricts himself to Iberian literature and begins his analysis with Galician-Portuguese shipwreck poetry (3-19), where the Christian paradigm of miraculous salvation (as opposed to perdition) predominates, and argues that the HTM collects texts which posit subversion in problematic ways.
In 13th-16 century Castilian and Galician-Portuguese comic-erotic and satiric-obscene poems, some presented here in English for the first time, the gender status quo could be challenged.