Galilean

(redirected from Galileans)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Gal·i·le·an

also Gal·i·lae·an  (găl′ə-lē′ən)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Galilee.
2. Archaic
a. A Christian.
b. Jesus.
adj.
Of or relating to Galilee or its people.

Galilean

(ˌɡælɪˈliːən)
n
1. (Bible) a native or inhabitant of Galilee
(Ecclesiastical Terms) the Galilean an epithet of Jesus Christ
adj
(Bible) of Galilee

Galilean

(ˌɡælɪˈleɪən)
adj
(General Physics) of or relating to Galileo

Gal•i•le•an

(ˌgæl əˈli ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Galilee.
n.
2. a native or inhabitant of Galilee.
3. a Christian.
4. the Galilean, Jesus.
[1605–15; < Latin Galilae(a) Galilee + -an1]

Gal•i•le•an

(ˌgæl əˈleɪ ən, -ˈli-)

adj.
of or pertaining to Galileo.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Galilean - an inhabitant of Galilee (an epithet of Jesus Christ)
denizen, dweller, habitant, inhabitant, indweller - a person who inhabits a particular place
2.Galilean - one of the four satellites of Jupiter that were discovered by Galileo
satellite - any celestial body orbiting around a planet or star
Adj.1.Galilean - of or relating to Galileo or his works
2.Galilean - of or relating to Galilee or its inhabitants
Translations

Galilean

[ˌgælɪˈliːən]
A. ADJ (Bible, Geog) → galileo (Astron) → galileico
B. Ngalileo/a m/f
the Galilean (Bible) → el Galileo

Galilean

adjgaliläisch
nGaliläer(in) m(f)
References in periodicals archive ?
In discussing the need for repentance, Jesus alludes to certain Galileans being killed by Pilate, the Roman governor of Judea (13:1).
Somewhere between the two extremes is likely to lie the historical truth about Galilee and its Galileans.
The fact that it was the notoriously linguistically challenged Galileans speaking so fluently to broadcast this event in other languages was the ultimate in Easter's dissonance between what was seen and what was heard that signaled the inbreaking of God's reign.
Two episodes, mentioned nowhere else in Scripture, are lifted up as examples of suffering and premature death: Pilate's cruelty of mingling the blood of the Galileans with their sacrifices and the collapse of the tower of Siloam.
The Galileans were often looked upon as a coarse people without history, traditions or prophetic succession .
Meeting Joseph and Mary looKing for a room, I'm sure the 'respectable' inhabitants of Bethlehem muttered: "We don't want any Galileans here
Jesus directly addresses whether the tragedy that befell a group of Galileans at the hands of Pilate in Jerusalem was a result oftheir worse sin.
He refused even to call them Christians, which he saw as a recognition that Jesus was divine; instead he called them Galileans, after Galilee, the place where Jesus spent most of his life.
In three Gospels the risen Lord sends the disciples to Galilee where they will see him (Mt 28:7; Mk 16:7; Jn 21:1); Luke does not send them back to Galilee, but at Pentecost the speakers are identified as Galileans (Acts 2:7).
First, some people talk to Jesus about a group of Galileans massacred by Pilate.
No, he made it clear that this was not his meaning, "Do you think that these Galileans were worse sinners than all the other Galileans because they suffered this way?
Finally, his need to pen a refutation of Julian's Against the Galileans shows equally that paganism in Egypt subsisted and that the Church had not suppressed the emperor's book; Cyril demolished it point-by-point, with ample quotation, as Origen had dealt with Celsus and Athanasius with Arius.