Diaspora

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Di·as·po·ra

 (dī-ăs′pər-ə)
n.
1. The dispersion of Jews outside of Israel from the sixth century bc, when they were exiled to Babylonia, until the present time.
2. often diaspora The body of Jews or Jewish communities outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. diaspora
a. A dispersion of a people from their original homeland.
b. The community formed by such a people: "the glutinous dish known throughout the [West African] diaspora as ... fufu" (Jonell Nash).
4. diaspora A dispersion of an originally homogeneous entity, such as a language or culture: "the diaspora of English into several mutually incomprehensible languages" (Randolph Quirk).

[Greek diasporā, dispersion, from diaspeirein, to spread about : dia-, apart; see dia- + speirein, to sow, scatter; see sper- in Indo-European roots.]

di·as′po·ric, di·as′po·ral adj.

Diaspora

(daɪˈæspərə)
n
1. (Historical Terms)
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
2. (Peoples)
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
3. (Bible) (in the New Testament) the body of Christians living outside Palestine
4. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (often not capital) a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
5. (Sociology) (often not capital) a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
6. (Peoples) Caribbean the descendants of Sub-Saharan African peoples living anywhere in the Western hemisphere
[C19: from Greek: a scattering, from diaspeirein to disperse, from dia- + speirein to scatter, sow; see spore]

Di•as•po•ra

(daɪˈæs pər ə)

n.
1. the scattering of the Jews to countries outside of Palestine after the Babylonian captivity.
2. (often l.c.) the body of Jews living in countries outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. such countries collectively.
4. (l.c.) any group migration or flight from a country or region; dispersion.
5. (l.c.) any group that has been dispersed outside its traditional homeland.
[1875–80; < Greek diasporá a dispersion, n. derivative of diaspeîrein to scatter. See dia-, spore]

Diaspora

the scattering of the Jews after the period of Babylonian exile.
See also: Judaism

diaspora

1. A Greek word meaning scattering, used to mean the dispersion of a people to other parts of the world, or the worldwide communities of a people, especially of the Jews.
2. The dispersion and exile of Jews, first by the destruction of the kingdom of Israel and of the kingdom of Judah and later by improved communications, commercial opportunities and especially the spread of the Roman Empire. Jews were scattered throughout Europe, Asia, and later North America. This dispersion was sometimes forced, such as in the exile to Babylon in 586 BC and at the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in AD 70.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diaspora - the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israeldiaspora - the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israel
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
2.Diaspora - the dispersion of the Jews outside Israel; from the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in 587-86 BC when they were exiled to Babylonia up to the present time
dispersion, scattering - spreading widely or driving off
3.diaspora - the dispersion or spreading of something that was originally localized (as a people or language or culture)
dispersion, distribution - the spatial or geographic property of being scattered about over a range, area, or volume; "worldwide in distribution"; "the distribution of nerve fibers"; "in complementary distribution"
Translations

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] Ndiáspora f

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] ndiaspora f
the Irish diaspora → la diaspora irlandaise

diaspora

nDiaspora f

Diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] nDiaspora

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] n (frm) → diaspora
References in periodicals archive ?
The Midrash speaks of Israel, the shoshanah of God, as a "rose among the thorns," in that, like Agnon's Shoshanah, it withstood foreign cultures while in Galut, preserving the purity of Jewish belief, of Jewish monotheism and spirituality.
Besides, the idea of changing one's name was not only to Hebraize it, but to break with the Galut, the Diaspora, to start a new chapter.
Klatzkin, Brenner, and Berdichevsky carried this thesis to the extreme by insisting that the Galut experience of the Jews must be negated and replaced by the Yishuv and the new type of Jew or Sabra.
Necessary Wounds and the Humiliation of Galut in Roth's The Counterlife and Operation Shylock.
And yet, for all the range and diversity of his writing-his exploration of Ashkenazi Jewry and the very different world of Yemenite Jewry, his probing of biblical themes and of the impact of the Bolshevik revolution on the Jews-one motif recurred repeatedly, that of galut and geulah, exile and redemption.
The narratives he portrays in the conversation between the Diaspora and Israel suggest that Diasporic Jews are inferior to Israeli Jews in Israel because Galut Jews are not true Zionists, as demonstrated by their choice to exchange the harsh life in Israel for a calm and prosperous life in the Diaspora (sitting around "pots of flesh"--Exodus 16:2-4).
Zionism was, among other things, a revolt against the Orthodox Jewish religion, that was associated with the Diaspora which Zionists contemptuously call Galut ("exile").
EISEN, GALUT 40 (1986); see also Meyers, supra note 37, at 135 (noting that this narrative "attests to the sense the Jews had of participation in the discourses of the wider culture").
exile repelled them because it was not only galut but the universal human condition of homelessness--which might now be overcome.
However much it was argued at the time that nation-building justified the insistence of Ben-Gurion and his disciples on the supremacy of Hebrew and the elimination of the jargon of the galut,'" he wrote in Midstream (July/August 2004), "it remains a shocking legacy of its early years that Israel's government persecuted Yiddish in a way it never did to any other language that new immigrants brought with them.
33) Luzzatto utterly rejected the Christian teaching that Jews have sinned so grievously that they cannot be saved and that God who once chose them has rejected them and chosen another people (Christians) in their stead, as evidenced by the lengthy galut (exile).