Diaspora

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Di·as·po·ra

 (dī-ăs′pər-ə)
n.
1. The dispersion of Jews outside of Israel from the sixth century bc, when they were exiled to Babylonia, until the present time.
2. often diaspora The body of Jews or Jewish communities outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. diaspora
a. A dispersion of a people from their original homeland.
b. The community formed by such a people: "the glutinous dish known throughout the [West African] diaspora as ... fufu" (Jonell Nash).
4. diaspora A dispersion of an originally homogeneous entity, such as a language or culture: "the diaspora of English into several mutually incomprehensible languages" (Randolph Quirk).

[Greek diasporā, dispersion, from diaspeirein, to spread about : dia-, apart; see dia- + speirein, to sow, scatter; see sper- in Indo-European roots.]

di·as′po·ric, di·as′po·ral adj.

Diaspora

(daɪˈæspərə)
n
1. (Historical Terms)
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
2. (Peoples)
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
3. (Bible) (in the New Testament) the body of Christians living outside Palestine
4. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (often not capital) a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
5. (Sociology) (often not capital) a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
6. (Peoples) Caribbean the descendants of Sub-Saharan African peoples living anywhere in the Western hemisphere
[C19: from Greek: a scattering, from diaspeirein to disperse, from dia- + speirein to scatter, sow; see spore]

Di•as•po•ra

(daɪˈæs pər ə)

n.
1. the scattering of the Jews to countries outside of Palestine after the Babylonian captivity.
2. (often l.c.) the body of Jews living in countries outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. such countries collectively.
4. (l.c.) any group migration or flight from a country or region; dispersion.
5. (l.c.) any group that has been dispersed outside its traditional homeland.
[1875–80; < Greek diasporá a dispersion, n. derivative of diaspeîrein to scatter. See dia-, spore]

Diaspora

the scattering of the Jews after the period of Babylonian exile.
See also: Judaism

diaspora

1. A Greek word meaning scattering, used to mean the dispersion of a people to other parts of the world, or the worldwide communities of a people, especially of the Jews.
2. The dispersion and exile of Jews, first by the destruction of the kingdom of Israel and of the kingdom of Judah and later by improved communications, commercial opportunities and especially the spread of the Roman Empire. Jews were scattered throughout Europe, Asia, and later North America. This dispersion was sometimes forced, such as in the exile to Babylon in 586 BC and at the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in AD 70.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diaspora - the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israeldiaspora - the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israel
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
2.Diaspora - the dispersion of the Jews outside Israel; from the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in 587-86 BC when they were exiled to Babylonia up to the present time
dispersion, scattering - spreading widely or driving off
3.diaspora - the dispersion or spreading of something that was originally localized (as a people or language or culture)
dispersion, distribution - the spatial or geographic property of being scattered about over a range, area, or volume; "worldwide in distribution"; "the distribution of nerve fibers"; "in complementary distribution"
Translations

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] Ndiáspora f

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] ndiaspora f
the Irish diaspora → la diaspora irlandaise

diaspora

nDiaspora f

Diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] nDiaspora

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] n (frm) → diaspora
References in periodicals archive ?
Mariano Gil; Januario Galut guided the American invaders to a secret path leading to Gen.
The existential problem that is Judaism's focus is exile (galut), and the alienation from God that galut entails.
De otro lado, y ya que las comunidades que se encuentran en el [phrase omitted] galut (14) se comunican en idiomas distantes del nmy hebreo, la madre se convierte en la encargada de la emision de la cultura hebrea a las nuevas generaciones, aunque ello exceptua y no exceptua al mundo judio [phrase omitted] sefardi, en tanto que esta tradicion posee un sinnumero de canciones en idioma espanol con narraciones de hazanas o narraciones eticas o epicas del pueblo de [phrase omitted] Israel, y por lo general son muy usadas en hogares judios como formas de transmision de la cultura.
But in both Israel and the modern western Galut, today that danger appears to have largely dissipated.
26) The Hebrew word galut expresses the condition and feelings of the Jewish people uprooted from their homeland and subject to alien rule.
From an early stage, the dominant cultural practices among Zionist settlers in Palestine were aimed at inventing a locally specific, 'native' Jewish culture, different from traditional, galut Jewish cultures.
2, 1899, the American troops succeeded in a fierce gunbattle with the Filipino revolutionaries at Tirad Pass with the help of a villager named, Januario Galut, to determine Filipino positions and outflank the defenders, which resulted in the valiant death Gen.
The American Jewish Zionist Newspaper, the Maccabaean, termed the Balfour Declaration, 'The Jewish Magna Carta,' The American Jewish Chronicle, "A Turning Point in Jewish History," The Canadian Jewish Chronicle, the "The End of the Galut.
We must, therefore, also recognise that we have to see the development of contemporary Jewish thought throughout the history of the Galut (exile and dispersion) as a continuing process, albeit in some ages more disruptive of previous traditions than in others.
Necessary Wounds and the Humiliation of Galut in Roth's The Counterlife and Operation Shylock.
And yet, for all the range and diversity of his writing-his exploration of Ashkenazi Jewry and the very different world of Yemenite Jewry, his probing of biblical themes and of the impact of the Bolshevik revolution on the Jews-one motif recurred repeatedly, that of galut and geulah, exile and redemption.
15) This theme of galut (the Hebrew term for exile or Diaspora) appears throughout Shapiro's work.