Ganges


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Gan·ges

 (găn′jēz′) also Gan·ga (gŭng′gə)
A river of northern India and Bangladesh rising in the Himalaya Mountains and flowing about 2,510 km (1,560 mi) generally eastward through a vast plain to the Bay of Bengal. The river is sacred to Hindus.

Ganges

(ˈɡændʒiːz)
n
(Placename) the great river of N India and central Bangladesh: rises in two headstreams in the Himalayas and flows southeast to Allahabad, where it is joined by the Jumna; continues southeast into Bangladesh, where it enters the Bay of Bengal in a great delta; the most sacred river to Hindus, with many places of pilgrimage, esp Varanasi. Length: 2507 km (1557 miles). Hindi name: Ganga

Gan•ges

(ˈgæn dʒiz)

n.
a river flowing SE from the Himalayas in N India into the Bay of Bengal: sacred to Hindus. 1550 mi. (2495 km) long.
Gan•get′ic (-ˈdʒɛt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ganges - an Asian riverGanges - an Asian river; rises in the Himalayas and flows east into the Bay of Bengal; a sacred river of the Hindus
Bangla Desh, Bangladesh, East Pakistan, People's Republic of Bangladesh - a Muslim republic in southern Asia bordered by India to the north and west and east and the Bay of Bengal to the south; formerly part of India and then part of Pakistan; it achieved independence in 1971
Bharat, India, Republic of India - a republic in the Asian subcontinent in southern Asia; second most populous country in the world; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1947
Translations
Ганг
Ganga
Ganges
Ganges
Ganges
Gang
Gangesz
Ganges
Ganga
Ganges
Ganges
Ganges
Ganga
GangГанг
Ganges
Ганг

Ganges

[ˈgændʒiːz] N the Gangesel Ganges

Ganges

[ˈgændʒiːz] n
the Ganges → le Gange

Ganges

nGanges m

Ganges

[ˈgændʒiːz] n the Gangesil Gange
References in classic literature ?
The valleys of the Ganges, the Nile, and the Shine having yielded their crop, it remains to be seen what the valleys of the Amazon, the Plate, the Orinoco, the St.
At the crucial instant of renunciation she was greatly helped by the reflection that she closely resembled the heathen mothers who cast their babes to the crocodiles in the Ganges.
In the chronicles of the ancient dynasty of the Sassanidae, who reigned for about four hundred years, from Persia to the borders of China, beyond the great river Ganges itself, we read the praises of one of the kings of this race, who was said to be the best monarch of his time.
They were the dead of the Indian villages, carried by the Ganges to the level of the sea, and which the vultures, the only undertakers of the country, had not been able to devour.
Formerly one was obliged to travel in India by the old cumbrous methods of going on foot or on horseback, in palanquins or unwieldly coaches; now fast steamboats ply on the Indus and the Ganges, and a great railway, with branch lines joining the main line at many points on its route, traverses the peninsula from Bombay to Calcutta in three days.
The general route of the Great Indian Peninsula Railway is as follows: Leaving Bombay, it passes through Salcette, crossing to the continent opposite Tannah, goes over the chain of the Western Ghauts, runs thence north-east as far as Burhampoor, skirts the nearly independent territory of Bundelcund, ascends to Allahabad, turns thence eastwardly, meeting the Ganges at Benares, then departs from the river a little, and, descending south-eastward by Burdivan and the French town of Chandernagor, has its terminus at Calcutta.
Elisabeth de Rossan, Marquise de Ganges, was one of the famous women of the court of Louis XIV.
It is a fiction of the Indians, that Cupid was first seen floating in one of these down the river Ganges - and that he still loves the cradle of his childhood.
So closely had the nations raced along the path of research and invention, so secret and yet so parallel had been their plans and acquisitions, that it was within a few hours of the launching of the first fleet in Franconia that an Asiatic Armada beat its west-ward way across, high above the marvelling millions in the plain of the Ganges.
I had just got past the goose-step, and learned to handle my musket, when I was fool enough to go swimming in the Ganges.
Now the trunks of trees on the bottom, and the old log canoe, and the dark surrounding woods, are gone, and the villagers, who scarcely know where it lies, instead of going to the pond to bathe or drink, are thinking to bring its water, which should be as sacred as the Ganges at least, to the village in a pipe, to wash their dishes with
He would come triumphantly flying out of Vesuvius and Aetna ahead of the lava, and would boil unharmed in the hot springs of Iceland, and would float majestically down the Ganges and the Nile.