Gascon


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Related to Gascon: Gascogne, simethicone, Dimethicone, Gaviscon

Gas·con

 (găs′kən)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Gascony.
2. The Romance language of Gascony, sometimes considered a dialect of Occitan.
adj.
Of or relating to Gascony, the Gascons, or their language or culture.

[French, from Latin Vasconēs, the Basques.]

gas·con

 (găs′kən)
n.
A boastful person; a braggart.

[From Gascon (from the traditional stereotype of Gascons as braggarts).]

Gascon

(ˈɡæskən)
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Gascony
2. (Languages) the dialect of French spoken in Gascony
adj
of or relating to Gascony, its inhabitants, or their dialect of French

Gascon

(ˈɡæskən)
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Gascony
2. (Languages) the dialect of French spoken in Gascony
adj
of or relating to Gascony, its inhabitants, or their dialect of French

Gas•con

(ˈgæs kən)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Gascony.
2. the Romance speech of Gascony.
3. (l.c.) boaster; braggart.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to Gascony, its inhabitants, or their speech.
[1325–75; < Old French, ultimately < Latin Vascōnēs]
Translations

Gascon

[ˈgæskən]
A. ADJgascón
B. N
1.gascón/ona m/f
2. (Ling) → gascón m
References in classic literature ?
When I returned with my dear-bought honours, purchased by toil and blood, I found her wedded to a Gascon squire, whose name was never heard beyond the limits of his own paltry domain
I will," said the boy, and he went on to say, "This figure that you see here on horseback, covered with a Gascon cloak, is Don Gaiferos himself, whom his wife, now avenged of the insult of the amorous Moor, and taking her stand on the balcony of the tower with a calmer and more tranquil countenance, has perceived without recognising him; and she addresses her husband, supposing him to be some traveller, and holds with him all that conversation and colloquy in the ballad that runs-
Thanks to this Gascon toilet, I could hope that the lady would not take me for the local rate collector; but now when my thoughts travel back to that episode of my youth, I sometimes laugh at my own expense.
Imagine to yourself a Don Quixote of eighteen; a Don Quixote without his corselet, without his coat of mail, without his cuisses; a Don Quixote clothed in a wooden doublet, the blue color of which had faded into a nameless shade between lees of wine and a heavenly azure; face long and brown; high cheek bones, a sign of sagacity; the maxillary muscles enormously developed, an infallible sign by which a Gascon may always be detected, even without his cap--and our young man wore a cap set off with a sort of feather; the eye open and intelligent; the nose hooked, but finely chiseled.
My son," said the old Gascon gentleman, in that pure Bearn PATOIS of which Henry IV could never rid himself, "this horse was born in the house of your father about thirteen years ago, and has remained in it ever since, which ought to make you love it.
cried the Gascon, who reckoned upon this letter for making his way at court.
Possessed by this idea, the cardinal resolved to know all about D'Artagnan immediately; of course he could not inquire from D'Artagnan himself who he was and what had been his career; he remarked, however, in the course of conversation that the lieutenant of musketeers spoke with a Gascon accent.
And D'Artagnan spoke honestly when he spoke thus; for the skin of our Gascon was a very thin one.
The Gascon warrior winced a little at the allusion, nor were his countrymen around him better pleased, for on the only occasion when they had encountered the arms of France without English aid they had met with a heavy defeat.
There are some who say, sire," said the burly De Clisson, "that the score is already overpaid, for that without Gascon help Bertrand had not been taken at Auray, nor had King John been overborne at Poictiers.
The man shall answer to me, be he Gascon or English, who carries it beyond this room.
We are your subjects, sire," said the Gascon barons, though with no very good grace.