volvulus

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vol·vu·lus

 (vŏl′vyə-ləs, vôl′-)
n.
Abnormal twisting of the intestine causing obstruction.

[New Latin, from Latin volvere, to turn; see volvox.]

volvulus

(ˈvɒlvjʊləs)
n, pl -luses
(Pathology) pathol an abnormal twisting of the intestines causing obstruction
[C17: from New Latin, from Latin volvere to twist]

vol•vu•lus

(ˈvɒl vyə ləs)

n., pl. -lus•es.
a twisting of the intestine, causing obstruction.
[1670–80; < New Latin, derivative of Latin volv(ere) to turn, twist]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.volvulus - abnormal twisting of the intestines (usually in the area of the ileum or sigmoid colon) resulting in intestinal obstruction
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

vol·vu·lus

a. vólvulo, obstrucción intestinal causada por torsión o anudamiento del intestino en torno al mesenterio.

volvulus

n vólvulo
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References in periodicals archive ?
Loftus observed, the clinical presentation and endoscopic findings raise a red flag for chronic gastric volvulus.
Occasionally the life-threatening complication of gastric volvulus, with or without strangulation, may present acutely.
Gastric volvulus is defined as an abnormal rotation of the stomach of more than 180[degrees], creating a closed loop obstruction that can result in incarceration and strangulation.
Gastric volvulus is a rare clinical entity, and a clinically relevant cause of acute abdominal pain in adults.
shock), gastric volvulus, gastric-outlet obstruction, pancreatitis, cancer, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, overwhelming infection, severe hypothermia, severe emesis, herpes infection, nasogastric-tube trauma, and hyperglycemia (particularly in diabetic ketoacidosis).
While in Dewsbury District Hospital Mrs Oldroyd developed an extremely rare condition, gastric volvulus, a twisting of the stomach.
There are 2 major types of gastric volvulus, organoaxial and mesenteroaxial.
Clinical suspicion of acute gastric volvulus is based on Borchart's triad: (i) severe, sudden epigastric pain; (ii) intractable retching without vomit production; and (iii) inability to pass a nasogastric tube into the stomach.