gate control theory


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gate control theory

A theory which states that pain may be relieved by the application of pressure to certain parts of the body because the brain receives messages concerning pressure faster that it receives messages concerning pain. In other words, once a pressure message has reached the brain, the “gateway” for further (i.e. pain) messages is closed.
References in periodicals archive ?
This gate control theory is the basis of various methods of pain relief, e.
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a basic physical therapeutic procedure for pain modulation and its effects are based on the pain entrance gate control theory and pain neurohumoral modulation, via endogenous opiate system.
This type of focal point utilizes Melzack and Wall's Gate Control Theory of Pain (1965).
According to the gate control theory, there are "gates" in the nervous system that open and close, influencing nerve transmission.
Gate control theory is considered to be one of most accepted theory of pain.
This review provides information about cancer incidences, cancer pain and CAM, massage therapy and its use among cancer patients for pain management and, gate control theory.
According to the gate control theory of pain, one's thoughts, beliefs, and emotions may affect how much pain is felt from a given physical sensation.
The work of Melzack and Wall (1965) (1) and their proposal of the gate control theory of pain, such that signals from large sensory fibres decrease the transmission of neuropathic pain signals from small fibre afferents (fast blocks slow), provides a window to the underlying physiology.
DentalVibe employs the gate control theory of pain management--meaning it creates a diversion for the brain.
Gate control theory after its introduction in the 1960s assumed a dominant influence within the professional corridors of pain management.
Melzack and Wall, in 1965, have proposed what is considered today on of the most influential theory to explain the pain experience: the Gate Control Theory (GCT).
This videotape, sensitive to the fact that pain is subjective, reviews the research published in 1965 on the Gate Control Theory of Pain.