gate control theory

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gate control theory

A theory which states that pain may be relieved by the application of pressure to certain parts of the body because the brain receives messages concerning pressure faster that it receives messages concerning pain. In other words, once a pressure message has reached the brain, the “gateway” for further (i.e. pain) messages is closed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The journal also highlighted how the DentalVibe operates on the principles of "The Gate Control Theory of Pain," co-developed by Canadian psychologist Dr.
The work of Melzack and Wall (1965) (1) and their proposal of the gate control theory of pain, such that signals from large sensory fibres decrease the transmission of neuropathic pain signals from small fibre afferents (fast blocks slow), provides a window to the underlying physiology.
The introduction of the gate control theory of pain by Melzack and Wall (1965) expanded the conceptualization of the etiology of pain.