Gates


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Related to Gates: Bill Gates, Logic gates

gate 1

 (gāt)
n.
1. A structure that can be swung, drawn, or lowered to block an entrance or a passageway.
2.
a. An opening in a wall or fence for entrance or exit.
b. The structure surrounding such an opening, such as the monumental or fortified entrance to a palace or walled city.
3.
a. A doorway or walkway in a terminal, as at an airport, through which passengers proceed when embarking or disembarking.
b. A waiting area inside a terminal, abutting such a doorway or walkway.
4. A means of access: the gate to riches.
5. A mountain pass.
6. The total paid attendance or admission receipts at a public event: a good gate at the football game.
7. A device for controlling the passage of water or gas through a dam or conduit.
8. The channel through which molten metal flows into a shaped cavity of a mold.
9. Sports A passage between two upright poles through which a skier must go in a slalom race.
10. A logic gate.
tr.v. gat·ed, gat·ing, gates
1. Chiefly British To confine (a student) to the grounds of a college as punishment.
2. Electronics To select part of (a wave) for transmission, reception, or processing by magnitude or time interval.
3. To furnish with a gate: "The entrance to the rear lawn was also gated" (Dean Koontz).
Idioms:
get the gate Slang
To be dismissed or rejected.
give (someone) the gate Slang
1. To discharge from a job.
2. To reject or jilt.

[Middle English, from Old English geat.]

gate 2

 (gāt)
n. Archaic
1. A path or way.
2. A particular way of acting or doing; manner.

[Middle English, from Old Norse gata; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]

Gates

 (gāts), Horatio 1728?-1806.
American Revolutionary general who became a hero after winning the Battle of Saratoga (1777) but suffered a humiliating defeat at Camden, South Carolina (1780).

Gates

, William Henry Known as "Bill." Born 1955.
American computer software designer and business executive who cofounded Microsoft in 1975 and as chairman built it into one of the largest computer software manufacturers in the world.

Gates

(ɡeɪts)
n
1. (Biography) Bill, full name William Henry Gates. born 1955, US computer-software executive and philanthropist; founder (1976) of Microsoft Corporation
2. (Biography) Henry Louis. born 1950, US scholar and critic, who pioneered African-American studies in such works as Figures in Black (1987)
3. (Biography) Horatio. ?1728–1806, American Revolutionary general: defeated the British at Saratoga (1777)

Gates

(geɪts)

n.
1. Horatio, 1728–1806, American Revolutionary general, born in England.
2. William (Bill), born 1956, U.S. computer software entrepreneur.

gates

Two solid uniform flagpoles, alternately blue or red with flags of the same color; used to define twisting slalom courses.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gates - United States computer entrepreneur whose software company made him the youngest multi-billionaire in the history of the United States (born in 1955)Gates - United States computer entrepreneur whose software company made him the youngest multi-billionaire in the history of the United States (born in 1955)
References in classic literature ?
With other men he lived in a box car and away they went from town to town painting the railroad property-switches, crossing gates, bridges, and stations.
Then that success, which was already so well known, was officially announced; the favored band who were selected to guard the gates of the fort were detailed, and defiled before their chief; the signal of their approach was given, and all the usual preparations for a change of masters were ordered and executed directly under the guns of the contested works.
The place was better the day I bought it, when it was running wild; you could pick flowers all the way to the gates.
I found our fortress in a bad state of defence, but we proceeded immediately to repair our flanks, strengthen our gates and posterns, and form double bastions, which we compleated in ten days.
It makes me think of English places that you read about, for there are hedges and walls and gates that lock, and lots of separate little houses for the gardeners and people.
And now surrounded, like the saint-like personage of olden times, with a radiant halo, that glorified him amid this gloomy night of sin -- as if the departed Governor had left him an inheritance of his glory, or as if he had caught upon himself the distant shine of the celestial city, while looking thitherward to see the triumphant pilgrim pass within its gates -- now, in short, good Father Wilson was moving homeward, aiding his footsteps with a lighted lantern
In this enterprise, however, he had more real difficulties than generally fell to the lot of a knight-errant of yore, who seldom had anything but giants, enchanters, fiery dragons, and such like easily conquered adversaries, to contend with and had to make his way merely through gates of iron and brass, and walls of adamant to the castle keep, where the lady of his heart was confined; all which he achieved as easily as a man would carve his way to the centre of a Christmas pie; and then the lady gave him her hand as a matter of course.
Grose and my younger pupil had already rolled out of the gates.
Just as he came to the park gates the little thing turned toward them; the man, without word or warning, wrenched the creature's head round with such a force and suddenness that he nearly threw it on its haunches.
If one of them be a minute late, he will be docked an hour's pay, and if he be many minutes late, he will be apt to find his brass check turned to the wall, which will send him out to join the hungry mob that waits every morning at the gates of the packing houses, from six o'clock until nearly half-past eight.
they look like great gates of pearl; and you can see beyond them--far, far off--it's all gold.
There was an exchange of bugle blasts; then a parley from the walls, where men-at-arms, in hauberk and morion, marched back and forth with halberd at shoulder under flapping banners with the rude figure of a dragon displayed upon them; and then the great gates were flung open, the drawbridge was lowered, and the head of the cavalcade swept forward under the frowning arches; and we, following, soon found ourselves in a great paved court, with towers and turrets stretching up into the blue air on all the four sides; and all about us the dismount was going on, and much greeting and ceremony, and running to and fro, and a gay display of moving and intermingling colors, and an altogether pleasant stir and noise and confusion.