Gaul


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Related to Gaul: Conquest of Gaul

Gaul 1

 (gôl)
n.
1. A Celt of ancient Gaul.
2. A French person.

Gaul 2

 (gôl) Formerly Gal·li·a (găl′ē-ä)
An ancient region of western Europe south and west of the Rhine River, west of the Alps, and north of the Pyrenees, corresponding roughly to modern-day France and Belgium. The Romans extended the designation to include northern Italy, particularly after Julius Caesar's conquest of the area in the Gallic Wars (58-51 bc).

Gaul

(ɡɔːl)
n
1. (Placename) an ancient region of W Europe corresponding to N Italy, France, Belgium, part of Germany, and the S Netherlands: divided into Cisalpine Gaul, which became a Roman province before 100 bc, and Transalpine Gaul, which was conquered by Julius Caesar (58–51 bc). Latin name: Gallia
2. (Historical Terms) a native of ancient Gaul
3. a Frenchman

Gaul

(gɔl)

n.
1. an ancient region in W Europe, including the modern areas of N Italy, France, Belgium, and the S Netherlands: consisted of two main divisions, one part S of the Alps (Cisalpine Gaul) and another part N of the Alps (Transalpine Gaul).
2. a province of the ancient Roman Empire, including the territory corresponding to modern France, Belgium, the S Netherlands, Switzerland, N Italy, and Germany W of the Rhine.
3. a native or inhabitant of Gaul.
4. a native or inhabitant of France.
Latin, Gallia (for defs. 1,2).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gaul - a person of French descentGaul - a person of French descent    
French person, Frenchman, Frenchwoman - a person of French nationality
2.Gaul - a Celt of ancient Gaul
Celt, Kelt - a member of a European people who once occupied Britain and Spain and Gaul prior to Roman times
Galatian - a native or inhabitant of Galatia in Asia Minor (especially a member of a people believed to have been Gauls who conquered Galatia in the 3rd century BC)
3.Gaul - an ancient region of western Europe that included what is now northern Italy and France and Belgium and part of Germany and the Netherlands
Translations
GalGalie
GalliaGallus
gallargallerGallia

Gaul

[gɔːl] N
1.Galia f
2. (= person) → galo/a m/f

Gaul

[ˈgɔːl] n
(= country) → Gaule f
(= person) → Gaulois(e) m/f

Gaul

n (= country)Gallien nt; (= person)Gallier(in) m(f)

Gaul

[gɔːl] n
a. (country) → Gallia
b. (person) → gallo
References in classic literature ?
Many an argument did he have with the curate of his village (a learned man, and a graduate of Siguenza) as to which had been the better knight, Palmerin of England or Amadis of Gaul.
Recollecting, however, that the valiant Amadis was not content to call himself curtly Amadis and nothing more, but added the name of his kingdom and country to make it famous, and called himself Amadis of Gaul, he, like a good knight, resolved to add on the name of his, and to style himself Don Quixote of La Mancha, whereby, he considered, he described accurately his origin and country, and did honour to it in taking his surname from it.
Julius Caesar took Pompey unprovided, and laid asleep his industry and preparations, by a fame that he cunningly gave out: Caesar's own soldiers loved him not, and being wearied with the wars, and laden with the spoils of Gaul, would forsake him, as soon as he came into Italy.
This time, however, there was no question either of the triumph of Pompey or of Caesar; neither of the defeat of Mithridates, nor of the conquest of Gaul.
The creation of a thousand forests is in one acorn, and Egypt, Greece, Rome, Gaul, Britain, America, lie folded already in the first man.
This life of ours is stuck round with Egypt, Greece, Gaul, England, War, Colonization, Church, Court and Commerce, as with so many flowers and wild ornaments grave and gay.
If I say "Caesar conquered Gaul," a person who knows the meaning of the three words composing my statement knows as much as can be known about the nature of the objective which would make my statement true.
In the one case, what happens is that I remember the content "eating my breakfast"; in the other case, I assent to the content "Caesar's conquest of Gaul occurred.
Cover thy poll, Gaul, cover thy poll,” cried the driver, who was Mr.
The divine and the negro seized the incarcerated Gaul by his legs and extricated him from a snow-bank of three feet in depth, whence his voice had sounded as from the tombs.
When they reached their box the house was darkened and the orchestra was playing "The Cloak of Old Gaul.
The readers of the Hosannah will re- gret to learn that the hadndsome and popular Sir Charolais of Gaul, who dur- ing his four weeks' stay at the Bull and Halibut, this city, has won every heart by his polished manners and elegant conversation, will pull out to-day for home.