Gay-Lussac


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Gay-Lus·sac

 (gā′lə-săk′, -lü-säk′), Joseph Louis 1778-1850.
French chemist and physicist who isolated boron (1809) and formulated a law that explains the behavior of a gas under constant pressure.

Gay-Lussac

(ˈɡeɪˈluːsæk; French ɡɛlysak)
n
(Biography) Joseph Louis (ʒozɛf lwi). 1778–1850, French physicist and chemist: discovered the law named after him (1808), investigated the effects of terrestrial magnetism, isolated boron and cyanogen, and discovered methods of manufacturing sulphuric and oxalic acids

Gay-Lus•sac

(ˌgeɪ ləˈsæk)

n.
Joseph Louis, 1778–1850, French chemist and physicist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gay-Lussac - French chemist and physicist who first isolated boron and who formulated the law describing the behavior of gases under constant pressure (1778-1850)Gay-Lussac - French chemist and physicist who first isolated boron and who formulated the law describing the behavior of gases under constant pressure (1778-1850)
References in classic literature ?
Brioschi and Gay-Lussac did; but then the blood burst from their mouths and ears.
Gay-Lussac the chemist, Laplace the astronomer, Larrey the surgeon, de Suze the advocate, are here, and with them are Talma, Bellini, Rubini; de Balzac, Beaumarchais, Beranger; Moliere and Lafontaine, and scores of other men whose names and whose worthy labors are as familiar in the remote by-places of civilization as are the historic deeds of the kings and princes that sleep in the marble vaults of St.
Not less does the brain of Davy or of Gay-Lussac, from childhood exploring the affinities and repulsions of particles, anticipate the laws of organization.
This notebook describes more than 200 experiments undertaken by Gay-Lussac at the Ecole Polytechnique, where he was a professor.
According to the theoretical conversion of Gay-Lussac (1g of glucose provides 0.
Liebig started his training in Germany under Karl Wilhelm Kastner and subsequently spent time in Paris, where he met Louis Joseph Gay-Lussac (1778-1850), Louis Jacques Thenard (1777-1857), Michel Eugene Chevreul (1786-1889) (4, 5), and other French luminaries.
Louis Joseph Gay-Lussac, es el fisico y quimico frances que establecio una ley sobre la dilatacion de los gases que lleva su apellido.
En beneficio de quienes no tienen mucha paciencia para consideraciones eticas en el carril de alta, aviso de una vez que las razones para no pasarse el semaforo en rojo nada tienen que ver con Savater y si, en cambio, con Sadi Carnot, Gay-Lussac y (como casi todo) Isaac Newton.
Gay-Lussac Scale ([degrees]GL): Invented between 1798 and 1850, the GL scale was used to measure percent of ethanol by volume.
And when he heard that Sir Humphry Davy in England had used a battery to break compounds down into their component elements, he provided funds to French scientists Joseph Gay-Lussac and Louis Thenard to come up with a bigger, better battery than the English had.
It was studied further by many scientists, including Scheele, Davy, Gay-Lussac and Lavoisier.
Davy from Great Britain, sharing the discovery of chloride with Gay-Lussac in 1809-1810.

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