Ge'ez


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Ge'ez

 (gĭ′ĭz, gĕ′ĕz, gē-ĕz′)
n.
A Semitic language, closely related to Tigrinya and Tigré, that was spoken in the empire of Aksum and is still used in the liturgy of the Ethiopian and Eritrean branches of the Oriental Orthodox Church. Also called Ethiopic.

[Ge'ez gə'əz, Ethiopian.]

Ge'ez

(ˈɡiːɛz)
n
1. (Languages) the classical form of the ancient Ethiopic language, having an extensive Christian literature and still used in Ethiopia as a liturgical language
2. (Historical Terms) the classical form of the ancient Ethiopic language, having an extensive Christian literature and still used in Ethiopia as a liturgical language
References in periodicals archive ?
Manuscripts and magic scrolls (prayer scrolls) feature an early Ethiopian language, Ge'ez, according to Laura Garrity-Arquitt of the museum.
Songs feature lyrics in English and the classical Ethiopic language of Ge'ez.
She also developed a passion for old books, mainly religious texts, some illustrated and invariably written on parchment in Ge'ez (the ancient language of Ethiopia).
20) Furthermore, the book of 1 Enoch was preserved in classical Ge'ez as part of the Ethiopic Bible.
The African Code employs the Ge'ez alphabet and treats Kiswahili as the official Pan-African language and, subsequently, Ge'ez as an African script to replace all forms of Latin to write all African languages.
Other early translations of the Bibles appeared in the Syriac dialect of Aramaic, in the Ge'ez language in Ethiopia and in Latin in Western Europe.
By 2000 BC there were strong ties and trade across the Red Sea into southern Arabia and this could have been the time when Ge'ez, which forms the basis for Amharic writing, developed.
Monks of the Orthodox church in Ethiopia began to write in the liturgical language of Ge'ez.
Ghebriel Woldai, the celebrant of the Mass, which was said in the Ge'ez rite for a small Eritrean and Ethiopian Catholic community that meets in the parish.
I don't think my grandfather could have ever foreseen that Eritrean Catholics from East Africa would be celebrating their ancient Ge'ez rite in suburban Atlanta.
The Kebra Nagast, or the Book of the Glory of Kings (written in Ge'ez and translated by the English Egyptologist E.
The thirty-two articles dedicated exclusively to Ethiosemitic languages such as Amharic and Ge'ez, which compose the bulk of the present work, introduce the reader to a broad array of linguistic issues, particularly within the realm of syntax and morphosyntax.