Geminga


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Geminga

(ɡɛˈmiːŋɡa; dʒəˈmiːŋɡə)
n
(Astronomy) astronomy one of the brightest and nearest gamma-ray sources, situated in the constellation Gemini. A pulsar, it is believed to be a spinning neutron star
[C20: from Gemini + gamma ray]
References in periodicals archive ?
To explain the observations of Geminga, a model of a dense neutron star with localized protons was proposed [29,30].
Felber was also an officer at Geminga Medical, Inc.
In the July 31 Physical Review Letters, the team suggests that the source of the electron-positron excess could be Geminga, a rapidly rotating stellar corpse known to emit gamma rays.
If the team is right about Geminga, not only would the excess cosmic rays be explained without invoking dark matter, but the finding would also mark the first time that astronomers have linked cosmic rays to any specific source in the sky.
The protons may also get their energy from a nearby pulsar, such as Geminga, a relatively young pulsar surrounded by a highly magnetized nebula capable of generating high-energy particles.
Geminga, or some other nearby source, may also be the culprit generating high-energy electrons, such as those recently captured over Antarctica.
The rapidly rotating remnant of a supernova explosion from 300,000 years ago, Geminga acts like a lighthouse beacon, regularly beaming radiation toward Earth.
Wang notes that his findings, presented at the American Astronomical Society meeting in January, argue against the proposal that a single, relatively close supernova called Geminga created the Local Bubble (SN: 1/2/93, p.
The pulsar Geminga now has a competitor for the title of nearest known pulsar to Earth.
The explosive birth of the powerful gamma-ray emitter Geminga -- until recently one of the most mysterious objects in the heavens -- could have pushed gas out of the nearby interstellar medium and created the bubble, says Neil Gehrels of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
Unlike the other two sources, associated with the Crab and Vela pulsars, Geminga apparently showed no pulsations and no traces of accompanying X-rays, radio waves or visible-light emissions.
So they called it Geminga, Milanese for "it doesn't exist.