Geminga


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Geminga

(ɡɛˈmiːŋɡa; dʒəˈmiːŋɡə)
n
(Astronomy) astronomy one of the brightest and nearest gamma-ray sources, situated in the constellation Gemini. A pulsar, it is believed to be a spinning neutron star
[C20: from Gemini + gamma ray]
References in periodicals archive ?
suggests that Geminga is a pulsar, or rapidly rotating neutron star.
Despite these similarities, however, Geminga was seen emitting gamma-ray pulses with no bright radio emission, while B0355+54 is one of the brightest radio pulsars known yet without a visible gamma ray signature.
To explain the observations of Geminga, a model of a dense neutron star with localized protons was proposed [29,30].
Felber was also an officer at Geminga Medical, Inc.
In the July 31 Physical Review Letters, the team suggests that the source of the electron-positron excess could be Geminga, a rapidly rotating stellar corpse known to emit gamma rays.
Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Bettina Posselt (Penn State University) and colleagues studied two very different pulsars, Geminga (left) and B0355+54, both of which are surrounded by clouds of X-ray-emitting particles, called pulsar wind nebulae, that are swept back by the pulsars' passage.
The protons may also get their energy from a nearby pulsar, such as Geminga, a relatively young pulsar surrounded by a highly magnetized nebula capable of generating high-energy particles.
Geminga "Powerful new observatories almost always solve longstanding astronomical mysteries.
Geminga, as the source became named, evaded detection with optical and radio telescopes of that era because it emits about 99% of its energy as gamma rays.
The rapidly rotating remnant of a supernova explosion from 300,000 years ago, Geminga acts like a lighthouse beacon, regularly beaming radiation toward Earth.
A mysterious object called Geminga (for Gemini gamma-ray source) has turned out to be a pulsar.
Wang notes that his findings, presented at the American Astronomical Society meeting in January, argue against the proposal that a single, relatively close supernova called Geminga created the Local Bubble (SN: 1/2/93, p.