gender-blind

(redirected from Gender blindness)

gender-blind

adj
(Sociology) not discriminating on the basis of gender, or not making a distinction between the sexes
References in periodicals archive ?
Gender sensitivity costs no government a penny; gender blindness costs every woman her life.
In 'The Body of the Condemned' I explore why his gender blindness is so problematic, examining the polarisation of the sexes and the discursive construction of gender itself, and make my case for reading the female body as a particular target of disciplinary power.
My aim is to discuss a number of issues connected with gender blindness that are prevalent in sociological studies about Israeli society.
Is this an omission or was there some reason for this gender blindness in the nineties?
Third, the gender blindness of the content of PRSPs is accompanied by a lack of gender sensitivity in the processes underlying PRSPs.
While the debate continues, gender activist Emma Moore said the idea of gender blindness is a moot point, as companies and advertisers reinforce stereotypes to such a great extent that girls cannot escape the "avalanche of pink".
Ali also takes issue with some of these jurists and exposes what must today be judged as their double standards, inconsistencies, and gender blindness.
However, until this utopia of gender blindness arrives, the ranks of the legal department must be seeded with the right attorneys--male and female--who can function as leaders in diversity and role models to their business partners.
Gender blindness means not paying attention to the different needs, interests, and roles of the various actors in a society.
Gender blindness is apparent in such areas as sports advertising which has a heavy male bias even though women often constitute a high proportion of the spectators at such events.
While gender blindness is beginning to recede with respect to high-incidence regions, for many low-incidence countries--including Canada--it continues to confound the management of HIV/AIDS.
McCormick raises the problem of color and gender blindness in constructionist strategies, arguing that this can "create a context which continues to favor the dominant group" and undermines "certain efforts which may be needed to realize equalization of educational opportunities" (47).