gender-blind

(redirected from Gender-blindness)

gender-blind

adj
(Sociology) not discriminating on the basis of gender, or not making a distinction between the sexes
References in periodicals archive ?
Disappointingly, Chapter Six, by Alister McGrath, titled "On Tolkien, the Inklings--and Lewis' blindness to gender," focuses primarily on the Inklings, mentioning the writer's female friends and his gender-blindness in only one short paragraph near the end of the piece.
As a feminist scholar, I strongly call for a boycott of gender-blindness in development practices as well as in policy processes.
It is envisaged that the harmonised and engendered training manual would replace gender-blindness with gender awareness and gender responsiveness for transformation of gender relations in school management within the vision of the Somaliland/Puntland/Galmudug gender mainstreaming strategy for gender equality in education.
These differences in the treatment of men and women existed despite proclamations of gender-blindness by the fund's staff.
These are the very differences the gender-blindness of the Michigan DOC cannot see.
It is in this spirit that I shall firstly explore why Foucault's gender-blindness is so problematic, and then go on to make my case for reading the female body as a particular target of disciplinary power in order to argue that gender, specifically femininity (3), is a discipline that produces bodies and identities and operates as an effective form of social control.
Given the gender-blindness of the planning process, large dam projects typically build on the imbalance in existing gender relations.
In these circumstances, there may still be genuine pockets of gender-blindness, but far more reactive gender-defensiveness and suppression are present where there is resistance to taking gender seriously in organizational theory.
Challenging gender-blindness in preservice secondary science teachers.
Mallin wishes, for instance, to avoid the oft-levied charge of gender-blindness - though, infelicitously, he declares this in the final paragraph of his introduction, and then hopes that no one will think this belatedness actually duplicates the very practice it ostensibly eschews; he is similarly unfortunate when he ties himself in knots by initially declaring that Elizabeth's advancing age made her ridiculous as a love-object and then by hastily explaining that there is, of course, no inherent reason for an older person not to be sexually attractive.
Though I liked the modesty of the Smith account, both in its initial refusal to be drawn into `spurious, worthless theorising', and in its open-ended final explanation, it could be argued that such open-endedness is, at least partly, a function of its gender-blindness.
The regents indulge the fantasy of color-blindness and gender-blindness and ignore the reality that race and gender pose serious systemic barriers that individual adversity does not account for.